EnglishSpanishChineseHindiVietnameseKoreanJapaneseTagalogLike us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter YouTube Google+ LinkedIn Follow Reeve on Instagram

Spinal Cord Injury Paralysis Resource Center

[+] Text[-] Text             print

Basics of the ADA

Standing from left to right are Rev. Harold Wilkie of Claremont, California and Sandra Parrino of the National Council on Disability. Seated from left to right are Evan Kemp, Chairman of the Equal Opportunity Commission, President George Bush, and Justin Dart of the Presidential Commission on Employment of People with Disabilities
Standing from left to right are Rev. Harold Wilkie of Claremont, California and Sandra Parrino of the National Council on Disability. Seated from left to right are Evan Kemp, Chairman of the Equal Opportunity Commission, President George Bush, and Justin Dart of the Presidential Commission on Employment of People with Disabilities

 The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) became law in July 1990. The law guarantees full participation in American society for all people with disabilities, just as the Civil Rights Act of 1964 guaranteed the rights of all people regardless of race, sex, national origin, or religion.

The ADA covers every person with an impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities.

Title I
The ADA prohibits private employers, state and local governments, employment agencies and labor unions from discriminating against qualified individuals with disabilities in job application procedures, hiring, firing, advancement, compensation, job training, and other terms, conditions and privileges of employment. An individual with a disability is a person who:

Has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities; has a record of such an impairment; or is regarded as having such an impairment.

A qualified employee or applicant with a disability is an individual who, with or without reasonable accommodation, can perform the essential functions of the job in question. Reasonable accommodation may include, but is not limited to:

Making existing facilities used by employees readily accessible to and usable by persons with disabilities; job restructuring, modifying work schedules, reassignment to a vacant position; acquiring or modifying equipment or devices, adjusting modifying examinations, training materials, or policies, and providing qualified readers or interpreters.

An employer is required to make an accommodation to the known disability of a qualified applicant or employee if it would not impose an "undue hardship" on the operation of the employer's business. Undue hardship is defined as an action requiring significant difficulty or expense when considered in light of factors such as an employer's size, financial resources and the nature and structure of its operation.

An employer is not required to lower quality or production standards to make an accommodation, nor is an employer obligated to provide personal use items such as glasses or hearing aids.

Employers may not ask job applicants about the existence, nature or severity of a disability. Applicants may be asked about their ability to perform specific job functions. A job offer may be conditioned on the results of a medical examination, but only if the examination is required for all entering employees in similar jobs. Medical examinations of employees must be job related and consistent with the employer's business needs.

Employees and applicants currently engaging in the illegal use of drugs are not covered by the ADA, when an employer acts on the basis of such use. Tests for illegal drugs are not subject to the ADA's restrictions on medical examinations. Employers may hold illegal drug users and alcoholics to the same performance standards as other employees.

Title II
The ADA prohibits discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities in all programs, activities, and services of public entities. It applies to all State and local governments, their departments and agencies, and any other instrumentalities or special purpose districts of State or local governments.

Title III
The ADA prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability by "private entities" operating places of "public accommodation." Businesses governed by Title III include banks, restaurants, supermarkets, hotels, shopping centers, privately-owned sports arenas, movie theaters, private day care centers, schools and colleges, accountant or insurance offices, lawyers' and doctors' offices, museums and health clubs.

 Sources: The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, The U.S. Department of Justice

Access BoardThe U.S. Access Board (or Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board) offers technical assistance on the ADA Accessibility Guidelines.

A Reeve Foundation Fact Sheet on ADA Basics (PDF)

U.S. Department of EducationThe DBTAC National Network of ADA Centers is comprised of 10 regional centers that provide information, training and technical assistance on the Americans with Disabilities Act. The centers are funded by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research under the U.S. Department of Education.

Federal Communications Commission (FCC)The Federal Communications Commission offers technical assistance on ADA telephone relay service requirements.

U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity CommissionIf you believe you have been discriminated against by an employer, labor union or employment agency when applying for a job or while on the job because of your race, color, sex, religion, national origin, age, or disability, you may file a charge of discrimination with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).

U.S. Department of JusticeHome page provides info and technical assistance with the ADA.

Quality of Life Grants DatabaseFind resources within the PRC Quality of Life Grants Database. Search by Zip Code, State or an Entire Category.

Library Books and VideosFind resources within the PRC library catalog.

ASK OUR EXPERTS
  • Email our Paralysis Information Specialists
  • Call our Paralysis Information Specialists
  • Call our Paralysis Information Specialists
  • Newly paralyzed or spinal cord injured? Start here.
Order Now! Paralysis Resource Guide
Paralysis Resource Guide

This FREE 442 page book is a comprehensive information tool for individuals living with paralysis and for their caregivers. Request or download your copy now!
¡Lea la versión electrónica en español ya mismo

Find Resources in Your Area

Check out programs in your area on our one-of-a kind online searchable Quality of Life program database. You can search by location or topic. GO



 
 

The Reeve Foundation Paralysis Resource Center Information Specialists are reachable business weekdays, Monday through Friday, toll-free at 800-539-7309 from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm Eastern U.S. Time. International callers use 973-467-8270. You may also schedule a call or send a message online.

The information provided in the Paralysis Resource Center was supported by Cooperative Agreement number 1U59DD000838-01 from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Its contents are solely the responsibility of the Reeve Foundation and do not necessarily represent the official views of the CDC.