A - C

A Chance For Therapy
Key Biscayne, FL
$5,600 – Physical/Occupational Therapy
This Quality of Life grant will support the Act4Me therapy program, which provides increased access to vital therapies for children with disabilities. Act4Me subsidizes the cost of speech, occupational, and physical therapy, and monitors each child's progress throughout the year. Act4Me also works to educate and empower parents/families through monthly follow-ups and annual evaluations of the child's progress. The Act4Me program focuses on children who are not able to attend the doctor-prescribed therapy due to the family's financial constraints, and serves uninsured or underinsured families of children with special needs. The program is open all year and provides weekly, continuous care for the children and supports the families whose care they fall under. Act4Me helps families find locations where they feel they can communicate and trust, and fully vets the therapy centers they partner with and recommend, such as The Arc of South Florida, Parent to Parent, SPEC Miami, Pediatric Therapy Center, Kidnetics, Alfano Center, and many others. Families may choose any therapy center that is licensed and insured and Act4Me will negotiate pricing with that center. Grant funds will support subsidized therapies for at least 26 children up to 18 years old that have paralysis-causing conditions such as brain and spinal cord injuries, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, ALS (pediatric/rare), stroke, spastic quadriplegia, spina bifida Gullain-Barré Syndrome, Hypertonia, and Erb's Palsy. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 5 percent of the total project cost).

Ability Now Bay Area
Oakland, CA
$3,500 – Durable Medical Equipment
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the upgrade of equipment for personal hygiene needs of participants in a day services program for adults aged 18-75. Participants reside in Alameda and Contra Costa Counties and have a variety of disabilities including cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injuries, stroke-related disabilities, multiple sclerosis, autism, spastic quadriplegia, seizure disorders, and other developmental disabilities. All of the program participants are low-income and receive SSI or SSDI benefits. Less than two percent receive some type of family financial support. Over fifty percent of participants are ethnic minorities. Grant funds will help to support two power treatment changing tables and one Hoyer lift. It is expected that this project will impact 100 adults with conditions including cerebral palsy, spina bifida, and spinal cord injury. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 50 percent of the total project cost).

Ability360 – Sports & Fitness Center (Center for Independent Living)
Phoenix, AZ (Medically Underserved Area)
$4,883 – Fitness and Wellness
Ability360 is the largest independent living center in Arizona, serving the Phoenix metropolitan area and Maricopa County. Ability360 programs include independent living skills instruction, peer support, information and referral, advocacy, home modifications, early intervention, community reintegration, youth transition, personal assistance services, work incentives consulting, employment, and social and recreational programs. Ability360 is co-located with eleven other disability services organizations at the Ability360 Center at 50th Street and Washington in Phoenix. Ability360 opened the Sports & Fitness Center for Persons with Disabilities on October 31, 2011. This 45,000-square-foot universally-designed (accessible) facility features include: two sport courts; rock climbing wall; indoor track; aquatic center with lap pool, therapy pool and spa; accessible locker and dressing rooms and showers; and a spacious fitness center with accessible equipment and group fitness room. There are currently over 1,800 members, of which an estimated 25% have a spinal cord injury, spinal bifida or other spinal conditions. The sports and fitness center is also used by local rehabilitation centers on community therapy outings as a resource in the community for individuals with newly acquired injuries as they transition from the hospital to the community setting. Quality of Life grant funds will support the purchase of a rickshaw machine for strength training that is user-friendly for members with limited hand dexterity. The rickshaw machine has a rack of weights with a simple pin to change the desired weight. The rickshaw also has the ability to be adjusted laterally, so the proper position can be obtained by an increased number of users. This machine will be used by more people at an increased level of independence. It is expected that 625 individuals ranging in age from 13 to 90+ years that have conditions including spinal cord injury, spina bifida, cerebral palsy, spinal meningitis, multiple sclerosis, ALS and muscular dystrophy. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 100 percent of the total project cost).

Adaptive Freedom Foundation
Honolulu, HI
$2,000 – Adaptive Sports
This Quality of Life grant will support three WASUP™ (Wheelchair Adapted Standup Paddle) Paddle Days a month in various locations on the islands of Hawaii. Adaptive Freedom Foundation (AFF) is dedicated to offering experiences for people with disabilities that are otherwise excluded from participation. AFF provides wheelchair-adaptive paddle boards to a significant percentage of Hawaiians who are challenged with standing and balancing. The Versatility Board™ secures a wheelchair onto a paddle board and allows community members with disabilities to get out on the water and enjoy what was previously impossible; paddling a board from a wheelchair. Like Duke Kahanamoku, AFF will perpetuate and share their Hawaiian culture of giving, Aloha and their Hawaiian surfing roots with the individuals with disabilities. Services are provided free-of-charge to all people with disabilities who want to get out on the water. Each event will take place at beaches, bays, and lakes, or any flat body of water that has wheelchair access. An area will be set up that will be comfortable for paddlers and their friends, family, and care takers to be comfortable and enjoy the day. Volunteer teams will assist transferring participants on to the board, teach paddling techniques, and assist in paddling when needed. Equipment is provided as needed, such as buddy boards, and traditional paddle boards for other attendees to and volunteers to paddle with WASUP™ paddlers. With past Paddle Days drawing 30-40 participants, and 3 events per month projected totaling 90 participants per month, this project could potentially impact 1,080 community members in a year. Grant funds will support the purchase of a beach wheelchair for the program. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 3 percent of the total project cost).

ADC Legacy Foundation (DBA Open Avenues)
Rogers, AR
$2,000 – Employment Program
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the Open Avenues Work Center, which focuses on independent living skills training, job skills training, paid work and, when possible, job placement. The goal is to help individuals with disabilities reach their fullest potential through a variety of tasks that allow them to use different muscles and different brain functions. Bus transportation, which picks up and drops off at their doorstep, is critical to people with paralysis and mobility impairments in allowing them to get out of the house and interact on a social level. In addition to work and basic living skills training, the Center offers small group sessions on current events, physical exercise and driver education training. Quality of Life grant funds will support accessible transportation costs for 7 clients with paralysis-causing conditions. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds .5 percent of the total project cost).

Adler Aphasia Center
Maywood, NJ
$13,143 – Peer Mentoring and Support (Caregiving)
This Quality of Life grant will support In-Home Virtual Aphasia Therapy for Stroke Survivors and Support for Aphasia Caregivers. Expanding on a pilot program conducted in 2015, this program will bring group communication therapy to individuals in the community that have had a stroke resulting in aphasia and their caregivers, using virtual communication and conferencing technologies. All group members will participate from their homes, and group meetings are led by experienced facilitators and counselors who can help them identify coping strategies and learn more about their loved one's condition and needs, as well as access helpful community resources. The main goal of this project is to make it possible for people with aphasia who are restricted in their mobility to benefit from programs and services that improve the quality of life for people with aphasia and their caregivers. It will provide them with a vital opportunity to mitigate their isolation, become connected with other people with aphasia, and begin to engage in the focused rehabilitation of their communication skills in a manner that gives them hope, and helps them communicate more effectively while feeling better about themselves and their ability to live more independently. For caregivers of people with primary progressive aphasia, the virtual support group is a unique effort to provide them with a monthly forum comprised of other individuals facing similar life challenges. In both projects, the use of virtual communication as a program platform is an innovative element that enables people with limited mobility to participate in rehabilitation and support that they could not otherwise access, and that can greatly improve their quality of life. The project expects to impact 120 individuals with stroke, brain trauma or neuro-degenerative disease and their caregivers. Grant funds will support programmatic expenses including 5 iPads that will be loaned to program participants and returned, personal computer for group facilitator, programmatic personnel, teleconferencing subscriptions, contracted group facilitator, and travel for home visits. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 1 percent of the total project cost).

Adventist HealthCare, Inc.
Gaithersburg, MD
$12,500 – Physical/Occupational Therapy
This Quality of Life grant will help to support a Wellness Cycling Program for individuals with Spinal Cord Injury at Adventist HealthCare Physical Health and Rehabilitation (PH&R), the first and only acute rehabilitation hospital in Montgomery County, Maryland, which has a population over one million. PH&R provides lifetime care for many persons with spinal cord injury in the community, including an open gym wellness program available for a nominal fee. The program provides members access to specialized equipment such as the RT300 FES cycle, which electrically stimulates the user's muscles to move the lower body pedals and/or upper body handles. The RT300 FES cycle is one of a small number of fitness machines that effectively enable a person with a spinal cord injury to exercise and derive the benefits of exercise. Members with a spinal cord injury use the equipment for 30 to 60 minutes at time. PH&R has one FES cycle in its outpatient program but demand for the equipment has grown and reduces members' access to the equipment. This project will add another RT300 FES cycle to the Wellness Program and enable twice as many members to use and benefit from the device. Grant funds will help to support the purchase of the RT300 FES cycle, and it is expected that at least 320 individuals with spinal cord injury and their caregivers will benefit. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 6 percent of the total project cost).

Agape Therapeutic Riding
Cicero, IN
$9.394 – Therapeutic Horseback Riding
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the installation of a SureHands lift at one of Indiana's largest and oldest therapeutic riding centers, classified as a Premier Accredited Center through the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH). The two main services provided are therapeutic riding, which teaches horsemanship skills and mounted horseback riding to persons with disabilities; and equine-facilitated learning/psychotherapy, which are designed for groups. Nearly 1,700 people with more than 40 different diagnoses are served annually–harnessing the power of horses to allow students, seniors, veterans, and those with disabilities to better understand themselves and their world. Currently, riders who have any type of spinal cord injury or mobility impairment are manually hoisted onto therapy horses by two to three volunteers, which increases the risk of injury to the riders, team and horses. The SureHands mechanical lift system will assist in mounting and dismounting riders with special needs safely and respectfully, and will impact annually at least 45 riders with a variety of paralysis-causing conditions, ranging in age from 5 to 90+ years old. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 86 percent of the total project cost).

ALSA St. Louis Regional Chapter
St. Louis, MO
$10,000 – Healthcare
This Quality of Life grant will help to support ALS Independence Kits, a project that will provide inexpensive personal equipment that will encourage self-sufficiency and support the dignity that is accomplished with routine daily tasks. First, setting the tone for a less frustrating and caregiver-dependent day are items that make getting ready by one's self less stressful. These include a universal cuff that assists shaving and brushing teeth for those persons who are losing the ability to make a grip; and dressing aids including button hooks, elastic shoe laces, and zipper pulls. Next are tools that allow people who have ALS to prepare simple foods and consume them without assistance. These include a straw clip that prevents a straw from moving around in a cup; a rocker knife that assists in eating; a foam tubing set that slips over flatware; and a bottle/can opener on a keychain that allows people to open water bottles without assistance. A gait belt that allows for easier, safer shifts in position and less stress on both the person who has ALS and their caregiver. Communication tools of a boogie board to eliminate paper issues and/or Pen Again sets of three pens each ease the motion of writing. All items will be enclosed in a tote bag to encourage their return to the ALSA loan closet when items are no longer useful. Grant funds will support supplies to create 100 ALS Independence Kits. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 41 percent of the total project cost).

American Association for Caregiving Youth
Boca Raton, FL (Medically Underserved Area)
$10,000 – Caregiving (Caregiving)
American Association of Caregiving Youth® (AACY) is the national resource for children who too often sacrifice their education, health, well-being and childhood to provide care for family members who are ill, injured, elderly or disabled. The only national study (2005), now more than a decade old, estimated there were more than 1.3 million children ages 8-18 years old in the United States who are caregiving youth. Soon after, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation funded a report, the Silent Epidemic (2006), that documented among young adults who dropped out of school, 22% did so to care for a family member. In Palm Beach County, Florida at least 10,000 children are identified as a hidden population of child caregivers with concomitant academic challenges. In 2006, the Caregiving Youth Project (CYP) was funded and initiated in partnership with The School District of Palm Beach County. It provides needs-driven prioritized services to child caregivers in school, out of school and at home. Since then, the work of this partnership has shown that with increased support, more than 95% of its participants are more likely progress to the next grade level, graduate from high school and become healthy productive adults. Since its inception, the CYP has served more than 1,100 caregiving students and their families. AACY has also established the Caregiving Youth Institute and is developing an affiliate network to assist other nonprofits in serving this population. The CYP is the only program in Palm Beach County specifically dedicated to supporting caregiving youth and their families. The proposed project would target 63 youth, who are caring for parents or grandparents with health conditions such as paralysis, limb loss, stroke, ALS or other neurological disorders and mobility limitations. Specifically, the proposed project would focus solely on in-home supports including: an initial home assessment by a licensed social worker; determination, referral and follow up of potential existing resources to strengthen the family; crucial home safety improvements such as wheelchair ramps, improved night lighting, bathroom safety bars and, with additional special resources, home modifications; and in-home respite care to provide relief for the youth caregiver and potential other family caregivers who share responsibilities for the physical needs of their family member who needs care. Grant funds will support the Family Care Coordinator, contracted respite care services, and home visit assessments. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 1 percent of the total project cost).

Anchorage Park Foundation
Anchorage, AK
$5,000 – Accessible Playground/Ball Field
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Jewel Lake Park Accessible and Inclusive Playground Improvements. This will be the twelfth accessible playground in Anchorage created by the Anchorage Park Foundation, and is the first accessible playground in southwest Anchorage. Previous accessible and inclusive playgrounds in Anchorage have been in central, north, and east Anchorage. The completion of this playground will fulfill a regional need for Anchorage children and families with disabilities who live near Jewel Lake Park, which has long been a location in critical need of an accessible playground. The 40.26 acre community-use park is one of two Anchorage parks with a swimming beach with lifeguards, meaning the park is a hot-spot for Anchorage residents throughout the summer months. According to the Municipality of Anchorage, over 30,000 swimmers use the beach each year. Because of the number of park users who visit the park each year, the current playground at Jewel Lake is host to a large amount of children. The current playground, while offering wonderful imaginative play (in the form of pirate ship-themed equipment) is lacking accessible and inclusive features and is long overdue for accessible renovations. There are four elementary schools within a two-mile radius of Jewel Lake Park, including Chinook Elementary, Sand Lake Elementary, Kincaid Elementary, and Gladys Wood Elementary. These four schools offer a total enrollment of 2,049 students; 245 of these students are enrolled in special education programs. Grant funds will support accessible play equipment. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 3 percent of the total project cost).

ArtStream, Inc.
Silver Spring, MD
$7,500 – Arts Program
This Quality of Life grant will support the Allies in the Arts program, which provides bedside and Family Room arts sessions at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center (WRNMMC ) in Bethesda, Maryland. The Allies in the Arts team of artists consists of four highly trained and experienced professional arts practitioners–a musician, a visual artist, a poet, and a multimedia artist specializing in improvisational storytelling–who work at the bedside of wounded military patients and in Family Rooms on the WRNMMC Wounded Warriors unit on Tuesday and Thursday evening each week for approximately three hours. Through their respective specialties, the Allies artists directly engage Wounded Warriors/veterans who have sustained paralyzing injuries during their service, and patients' family members and children are invited to participate as well. The most recent professional evaluation of Allies in the Arts confirmed that the project is meeting its principal goals: 1. To aid Wounded Warriors/veterans in their physical, mental, and emotional healing by increasing the self-identity and self-efficacy of wounded service members; and 2. To help family and friends of Wounded Warriors/veterans cope with the stress of intense caregiving, as well as normalize and reinforce relationships within the family and with the community. The specialists comprising the Allies team are highly trained artists experienced in arts in healthcare settings, all of whom have completed American Red Cross orientation and separate training regarding military life, combat, common injuries of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the impact of these issues on soldiers and their families, and particular considerations when devising and implementing arts experiences. The program will serve 900 individuals (and their families), 45 of whom have traumatic brain injury and/or spinal cord injury or have other paralysis-causing conditions are being treated for other acute care needs on the Wounded Warrior unit. Grant funds will support the costs for two of the four program artists. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 21 percent of the total project cost).

Asheville Buncombe Community Christian Ministry (ABCCM)

Asheville, NC
$8,400 – Facility Accessibility Modifications
This Quality of Life grant will support accessibility modifications to ABCCM's Veterans' Restoration Quarters (VRQ), a transitional housing facility that serves male veterans living with homelessness from across a 3-state region, identified as VISN 6 by the Veterans Administration. Veterans who are disabled and/or homeless face additional challenges when reintegrating into the job market upon returning home, including a lack of appropriate resources for recovery from injury, illness, or economic distress, societal stigma, and misconceptions related to the cost of covering disability in the workplace. Homeless veterans are provided with onsite case management, a full-time nurse, three meals each day, and access to career-level job training and placement. The VRQ is located in Asheville in a former motel that was purchased and repurposed as a 250-bed transitional housing facility in 2008. In 2015, ABCCM provided transitional housing and permanent supportive housing services to 462 veterans and 26 civilians at its VRQ. Additionally, 651 men used the VRQ as emergency overnight shelter. Male veterans may enter ABCCM's program through the VRQ and remain on campus for up to two years, though the average stay is approximately 8 months. Veterans are provided with the tools necessary to overcome barriers within a supportive community of other service members. Of the veterans who enroll, 85% of those who successfully complete the program and graduate into permanent housing with stable incomes. Of these, 94% remain in stable situations at 12 months. The National Veterans Technical Assistance Center listed the program among the top 4 programs for veterans in the nation, stating that participants “are not only graduating out of poverty – but into the middle class – and they are not coming back. Four out of five veterans are [graduating from] the program for good.“ Grant funds will be used to renovate two (of six) of its ground-floor transitional and permanent supportive housing units at the VRQ to meet ADA Accessibility Guidelines to fully serve the veterans living with homelessness throughout Western North Carolina. This project will increase the number of veterans living with disabilities that can be served at the VRQ, including those that are living with paralysis causing conditions. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 26 percent of the total project cost).

Barrow Neurological Foundation
Phoenix, AZ
$6,520 – Adaptive Sports
This Quality of Life grant will support the Barrow Connection: The Day on the Lake program, which has been in operation for 20 years at Bartlett Lake Marina in Carefree, Arizona. Bartlett Lake Marina is owned by Bryan Church, who sustained a spinal cord injury 36 years ago and has built one of the most accessible marinas in the state of Arizona. The marina is nestled in the mountains just northeast of Scottsdale, Arizona. The setting (and even the drive to reach it) is majestic and breathtaking. Barrow originally started Day on the Lake with the intention of introducing people with physical and neurological challenges, ages 3 and older, to adaptive water sports. Over the years, the Barrow Connection team discovered that when participants—including people with disabilities and their families—experience a day of recreation and play with one another, their souls are rejuvenated. Families are able to take rest from the everyday challenges of living with disabilities to enjoy fishing, kayaking or boating together. Family members board speed boats and take pictures of their loved ones water-skiing or tubing for the first time since incurring debilitating injuries. Many of these families have spent countless hours in waiting rooms for doctors and therapy appointments, while devoting countless more hours to learning how to overcome the challenges they face to accomplish even daily activities. Activities range from adapted jet-skiing, adapted water-skiing, wakeboarding and tubing, to kayaking and fishing and other water-related activities. Trained staff, volunteers and medical professionals assist with all aspects of the program to maintain the highest degree of safety for all participants. Day on the Lake allows families to build meaningful memories together in an awe-inspiring setting. It increases confidence and self-esteem of participants, and empowers attendees to break through barriers to explore more life-enhancing opportunities. The Day on the Lake program operates with one part-time CTRS that is the Program Coordinator and 155 volunteers that have gone through training, including seasoned volunteers as well as new therapy and nursing students. This program is a great introduction to the students as they become more aware of what people can do if just given the opportunity with trained volunteers and accessible equipment. Barrow Connection serves people ages 3 years and up who have various paralysis conditions, including: spinal cord injury, Spina bifida, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, stroke, brain injury, hemiplegia, cerebral palsy, polio, Guillain-Barré syndrome, and other physical and neurological conditions. An estimated 314 individuals with paralysis-causing condition and their families will be served by this project. Grant funds will support the two adapted water skis, with quick-release harnesses, and a Hoyer lift. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 18 percent of the total project cost).

Bennett Institute Booster Club
Baltimore, MD
$4,000 – Adaptive Sports
This Quality of Life grant will help to fund travel expenses for the Bennett Blazers Youth Sled Hockey team to travel to the 2017 USA Disabled Hockey Festival San Jose, California. The Bennett Blazers are not only the defending Youth Division-A (highest division) National Champions, but have won the championship three of the last four years. Growth in the hockey program and level of athlete commitment is linked to this team success. Sled hockey is offered weekly for children ages 6-18 from September through April, and has grown into one of the most popular team sports. In the last decade, participation has nearly doubled. During the 2015-16 year, 16 athletes played sled hockey with 94% (15 out of 16) having a form of primary or secondary paralysis due to spinal cord injury, spina bifida, cerebral palsy, stroke, or childhood cancer. During the regular season, Bennett teams compete in the Delaware Valley Hockey League which has eight teams spread from northern Virginia to central New Jersey. All teams are co-ed, but Bennett has the largest participation by girls who make up a third of the team, including the goalie. Funding for this project will energize one of the most experienced and successful junior sled hockey programs in the country by allowing these athletes to defend their championship. It also will allow the program to help USA Hockey's efforts to expand the reach of sled hockey by holding high level competition in the under-represented California region. Finally, funding will also foster growth of the teenage athletes independence and acquired life skills by providing experience traveling from Baltimore to California—a significant jump from previous competitions in the eastern half of the United States. Grant funds will support hotel accommodations for the team members as well as ground transportation (wheelchair accessible van) in San Jose, California for 35 individuals with paralysis and their caregivers. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 22 percent of the total project cost).

Brain Injury Association of Georgia
Atlanta, GA
$5,130 – Camp
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Camp BIAG (Brain Injury Association of Georgia), Camp BIAG is the signature program for survivors and caregivers in Georgia impacted by brain injury. It is the only program of its kind in the state, providing a camp experience to adults with brain injury and their caregivers. Camp BIAG provides an overnight social, recreational and therapeutic program that is uniquely designed for the special needs of adults with a brain injury. A caregiver camp runs simultaneously that is organized to give family caregivers a rare opportunity for respite, socialization and support through daily group sessions. Many caregiver family members use this respite time for a much needed mini-vacation or to rejuvenate and relax quietly at home. Camp BIAG is organized and led by a volunteer camp committee comprising BIAG board members and directors, therapists, nurses, a life skills coach, a social worker and a TBI survivor & caregiver. Camp Twin Lakes provides the camp facility and amenities, a camp coordinator and certified staff who help ensure safety with activities. Camp BIAG will accept 45 - 55 campers each year and recruit 45-plus professionals and students to serve as camp nurses, therapists and counselors. The high ratio of volunteers per camper helps to ensure the safety and welfare of all campers with a brain injury, physical disability or other impairment. Campers average in age from 20 to 70 and are from various cultures and backgrounds. A bonus for the students is that they receive training prior to camp in working with individuals with brain injury and mobility impairments and then gain experience in working with them at camp. For many students this is life changing, providing a unique perspective in understanding firsthand the needs of individuals with brain injuries and other conditions in a 24/7 environment. Camp activities include archery, fishing, boating, arts and crafts, games, BINGO, swimming, zip line, big swing, educational and support group meetings, karaoke, basketball, leather crafts, cook outs, ending with a dance and party on the last evening. Every activity is designed to be therapeutic yet recreational while building on life skills and socialization with new ones added each year based on feedback. Campers are allowed to select the activities they wish to participate in and are not forced to participate in activities that are not of interest to them. Grant funds will fund 38 scholarships for adults with brain injury to attend Camp BIAG. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 17 percent of the total project cost).

Breckenridge Outdoor Education Center (BOEC)
Breckenridge, CO
$5,560 – Adaptive Sports
BOEC is one of the oldest four season adaptive outdoor educational organizations in North America. BOEC provides a sense of freedom to those who are routinely excluded from activity due to a disability or special need. Whether alpine skiing, paddling the West's great rivers, or mastering the accessible ropes course, BOEC inspires people of all abilities to discover new places, learn new skills and rekindle their spirit in the heart of the Colorado Rocky Mountains. One of the top priorities of equipment needs is the river rafting program. This summer, BOEC did not have enough rafts needed to run all the adaptive programs to meet the demand. Three times this summer, BOEC had to rent an additional raft in order to run programs. BOEC runs day and multi-day raft trips on the Upper Colorado River, Green River and San Juan River. This Quality of Life grant will support the rafting program; specifically the purchase of a raft and life vests. The Brain Injury Alliance, Disabled Veterans, Adventures Within MS Camp, and a group with spina bifida are just a few of the camps that would benefit from this needed rafting equipment, serving an estimated 500 individuals with paralysis. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 41 percent of the total project cost).

Bridge Disability Ministries
Bellevue, WA
$25,000 – Durable Medical Equipment
Bridge Disability Ministries collaborates with other local, regional, and international private nonprofit and public agencies to advocate for and find solutions to meet the needs of people living with disabilities, to avoid duplication of services and to share best practices and use of resources. Bridge's Meyer Medical Equipment Center accepts donations of used medical mobility equipment (wheelchairs, scooters, Hoyer lifts, hospital beds, etc.) which are then cleaned, repaired and refurbished and given to people in need. This equipment is provided to people of all ages, ethnicities, and walks of life, regardless of race, religion, gender or gender identity, sexual preference, ethnicity, disability, or any other category, or their ability to pay. Grant funds will support three of the highest priority durable equipment needs for the people served by Bridge Disability Ministries: 22 batteries for electric wheelchairs (donated electric wheelchairs typically require new batteries); 26 ROHO Pressure Relief Wheelchair Seat Cushions; and Alternating Pressure Mattresses. At least 58 individuals with paralysis will be impacted by this project, most of whom have no other means of obtaining this equipment. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 100 percent of the total project cost).

Brooks Rehabilitation
Jacksonville, FL
$3,900 – Adaptive Sports
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Brooks On Ice—a component of the Pediatric Recreation program that offers classes and events focused on ice skating and sled hockey. Through safe and supportive adaptive ice skating equipment, participants build strength, balance, and coordination all through social opportunities with their peers. The sleds can be used for individuals who have the trunk control and want to explore skating outside their wheelchair. It's also a great piece of equipment to work on trunk control for children. Activities are open to kids ages 5 – 18 years old with conditions such as spinal cord injury, spina bifida, cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophy, and traumatic or acquired brain injury. Grant funds will support the purchase of 5 adapted sleds and 30 safety helmets for the ice programs. It is expected that 340 youth with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 4 percent of the total project cost).

Burke Rehabilitation Hospital

White Plains, NY
$6,280 – Caregiving
This Quality of Life grant will support two initiatives specifically designed for caregivers of individuals with spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, and other debilitating conditions. The first initiative is the creation of an educational, inspirational video that will provide valuable information aimed at helping individuals with disabilities navigate the challenges of everyday life, including managing stress and preventing burnout, as well as providing resources—including the availability of support groups and specialized therapy groups—that will benefit both the patient and the caregiver. The video will be prominently featured on the Burke website, will be distributed widely via social media (Facebook, Twitter and YouTube), and will run on public viewing monitors throughout the hospital. It will be created by a professional media production company and include interviews with Burke therapists and caregivers who have benefited from the participation in therapy groups. While it will include information that is both practical and educational, its purpose will be inspirational; to give caregivers a sense of hope about the future, an understanding that they are not alone on their journey, and a clear pathway to balancing the needs of the patient in their care with their own needs. The second initiative is an expansion of specialized therapy for caregivers of individuals with spinal cord injury, in the form of group therapy, as part of its continuum of care for patients facing long-term rehabilitation. A new group will be developed specifically for caregivers of individuals living with spinal cord injury. In 10 one-hour sessions, group participants will learn effective coping strategies to help those in their care deal with their new reality. They will engage in interpersonal peer support, benefit from psychological insights offered by the facilitator, and feel free to express feelings of frustration, anger, concern and confusion in a safe, supportive setting. Most important, they will realize they are not alone, and will receive the validation that can be so elusive, and yet so badly needed. Both activities in this project will be open to the public, and not restricted to patients who have been treated at Burke. Grant funds will support programmatic personnel and video production costs. It is expected that 150 individuals with spinal cord injury and their caregivers will be impacted by this project. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 100 percent of the total project cost).

Carrie Tingley Hospital Foundation
Albuquerque, NM
$3,500 – Camp
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the 2017 San Juan County New Mexico Adaptive Sports Camp, the second of what will be an annual event. The project is 5-day (July 17 - 21, 2017), fully adaptive and inclusive sports camp for children with physical disabilities. Campers will participate in the following adaptive sports: cycling, wheelchair basketball, archery, in-door rock climbing and sitting volleyball. The venue of camp will be the San Juan College of Human Health and Human Performance Center, which is fully ADA-compliant and accessible to individuals of all abilities. The camp will be organized and directed by two physical therapists that live and work in San Juan County. The camp will be staffed largely by physical therapy program student volunteers from San Juan College. Equipment for the camp is loaned by the San Juan Center for Independent Living. All volunteers will receive an orientation in advance of camp that includes person-first language and disability etiquette. While there is a nominal registration fee, no camper is denied participation because they cannot pay--full scholarships are available. Campers are identified through San Juan Regional Medical Center and Carrie Tingley Hospital. All campers will be pre-screened so that camp staff including the nurse will be prepared to support each camper. Children and families gain knowledge of adaptive equipment, rule modifications and inclusive practices; families increase their participation (as a family) in sports activities in their community; and children develop a positive attitude towards participation in sports activities. Grant funds will support programmatic costs for the physical therapists, which will enable about 30 youth (ages 5 – 24 years old) with paralysis, and their families to participate. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 23 percent of the total project cost).

Catalyst Sports
Marietta, GA
$4,250 – Adaptive Sports
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the Adaptive Paddling Adventure Program, designed to introduce persons with disabilities (particularly those with spinal cord injuries) to the enjoyment and fun of paddling while also providing them with the intrinsic physical and mental health benefits of the activity. The program aims to provide a natural journey that inspires disabled youth and adults to be more adventurous and explore the great outdoors. Through this program, participants can develop new skills while improving their endurance, strength, power, and overall physical fitness over the course of a year. This program meets on a weekly basis at local lakes to serve a total of 20-25 paddlers (along with their family members and/or caretakers if they are interested) who have physical disabilities such as spinal cord injury. Grant funds will support the purchase of 2 kayaks, 2 sets of kayak paddles, and 2 personal flotation devices, enabling expansion of the program to recruit an additional 23 participants. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 23 percent of the total project cost).

Challenged Athletes of West Virginia
Snoeshoe, WV
$6,000 – Adaptive Sports
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the Greenbrier River Trail Handcycle Program. This project will introduce cycling as a recreational option for children and adults with paralysis, and will provide the equipment necessary and so often out of reach of consumers. In addition to established events, the project will encourage individuals to reach out and become involved in more community-based fitness activities as well. Several marathons include a handcycle class, and triathlons with a team format would offer inclusion for a team member with a disability and help to level the competitive playing field. This project is not intended to provide individuals with a handcycle solely for their personal use. Rather, it is designed to engage people, produce a commitment and goals, and help them to achieve those goals. The project will assure that there are the opportunities and support necessary for success for at least 30 individuals in the first year. Grant funds will support the purchase of three Force 3 handcycles: one Force 3 with Quad Elite Set Up; one standard Force 3 handcycle, and one HOC Zipper Handcycle for kids. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 67 percent of the total project cost).

Chambers Memorial Baptist Church
New York, NY
$7,000 – Facility Accessibility Modifications
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the Accessible Elevator Project, which will expand accessibility to the second floor of the sanctuary, and will enable parishioners and community members that have mobility challenges to actively participate in programming. The building is a community hub for a wide range of resources and services for people in East Harlem, including a food pantry, group counseling, youth services, and plays and concerts. Through interviews and surveys, it was learned that about 25% of the 200 members have stopped attending service and programs due to the inability of getting to the second floor. This community fights the challenges of drugs and gang activity, and tragically, some individuals have been victims of gun violence. Expanded access to the second floor will enable at least 55 youth with paralysis as well as seniors that have decreased mobility to become more engaged in the community. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 7 percent of the total project cost).

Chanda Plan Foundation
Denver, CO
$10,000 – Healthcare
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Care Coordination for Individuals with Long-Term Physical Disabilities at the Chanda Plan Foundation Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) for individuals with physical disabilities. The Chanda Plan Foundation will open this new facility in early 2017, which will offer new services including primary care, mental health services, nutrition assistance, and chiropractic care; and expanded services including massage, acupuncture, and yoga. The PCMH will increase the Direct Services program's total weekly participants from 64 unduplicated individuals and will increase the ability of people living with paralysis and other mobility impairments, as well as their families, to live independently, and to be included and integrated into the community. The Care Coordinator will ensure participants are receiving needed services, including integrative services, primary care, behavioral health, nutrition assistance, and chiropractic care, in a population-competent setting. As seen by the results of participant surveys, the integrative services offered by the Chanda Plan Foundation enable participants to be more involved in the community and increase quality of life. The Care Coordinator will work closely with participants to make sure goals are being met and will adjust care plans if participants are not satisfied with progress. By connecting individuals and their families to community resources, such as funds to assist with home modifications and respite care for caretakers, the Care Coordinator will provide the opportunity to increase independent living. The PCMH will offer group classes (such as yoga and nutrition) that support community connections and the Care Coordinator will recommend these opportunities based on their knowledge of an individual or their family's needs. Community space and a tea bar in the facility will also create an opportunity for participants to connect with one another in an informal setting. Grant funds will help to support the salary for the Care Coordinator. It is expected that 217 individuals of all ages will be impacted by this project. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 20 percent of the total project cost).

Children's Research Triangle, Inc.
Chicago, IL
$4,500 – Camp
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Camp SOAR (Special Outdoor Adaptive Recreation), which provides social and recreational experiences for children with special needs. Camp SOAR has three main objectives: to provide outdoor, social and recreational opportunities for youth with special needs who otherwise have limited access to such programs; to provide respite and support for families with a special needs child; and to provide a positive volunteer experience for adolescents and young adults. The primary purpose is to provide youth with a positive and enjoyable recreational experience, promote skills development, increase self-reliance and self-esteem, and develop peer-to-peer relationships. Even with many camps designed specifically for children with disabilities, there is an expectation that participants have some degree of independence in order to attend. Camp SOAR is not diagnosis-specific and works with youth of all abilities, which has been essential to the success of the program. The long-term impact of Camp SOAR on campers include increased confidence, the willingness to try new things, independence and the ability to interact with new people. Camp SOAR emphasizes competence and skill-building such as brushing teeth and hair and using eating utensils independently. Camp SOAR counselors, many of whom work with campers of the same age as themselves or older, often express a change in their perception of people living with disabilities. Grant funds will support scholarships for 10 children with paralysis to attend Camp SOAR. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 4 percent of the total project cost).

City of Independence – Parks/Recreation/Tourism
Independence, MO
$6,669 – Fitness and Wellness
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the Roger T. Sermon Community Center, an inclusive community fitness and wellness center that provides superb fitness opportunities for all community members, regardless of ability level. Memberships rates for adults are currently $60 per year (an average of $5 per month). After conducting a survey of members, it was found that the piece of equipment that was most sought for individuals with paralysis was the NuStep T5 XR, one of the few pieces of fitness equipment that is specially designed to enable individuals that use wheelchairs to work out safely and independently. The NuStep will complement the accessible cardio area, circuit training room, weight room, gymnasium, and locker rooms. Grant funds will support the purchase of the NuStep T5 XR with oversized seat, and it is estimated that it will impact at least 100 individuals with paralysis and their families. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 100 percent of the total project cost).

Colorado Springs Independence Center
Colorado Springs, CO
$3,300 – Fitness and Wellness
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Get Out!–a project that will expand upon an existing spinal cord injury support group to provide recreational opportunities in the community. The major purpose of this proposal is to increase inclusion. Many of the peer support group members have never gone fishing, and have in fact been stuck in an isolated routine that keeps them home the majority of the time. By having a way to get outside, all members will benefit from the increased camaraderie of getting to know people in fun and different situations and not just in talking about their shared 'condition.' Members will experience using different modes of transportation and learn how to use these services again in the future. The group will also be able to take advantage of the deep integration that nature has to offer. Having a disability does not alter a person's appreciation for nature, and these activities will help broaden experiences, friendships, and knowledge of what activities are available in the community. Planned activities include three fishing trips at different locations, one three-day camping trip, and kayaking at Chatfield Reservoir. Each activity will have up to 25 participants. Grant funds will support the following activities: adapted fishing gear for 10 individuals, rental of Wilderness on Wheels campground facility, costs for the kayak activity day, and accessible transportation for participants for the trips. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 44 percent of the total project cost).

Common Ground Outdoor Adventures
Logan, UT
$10,000 – Transportation
This Quality of Life grant will help to support a bus that is equipment with a wheelchair lift to enable safe, accessible transportation for program participants. The mission of Common Ground Outdoor Adventures is to provide life-enhancing outdoor recreational opportunities for youths and adults with disabilities. The organization's vision is to enhance the lives of people with disabilities through quality outdoor recreation such as river rafting, downhill skiing, camping and much more. This is achieved by removing the physical, social and financial barriers faced by youth and adults with disabilities. This Quality of Life grant provides a required match to a Utah Department of Transportation grant for the ADA-approved 12-passenger wheelchair accessible bus. The vehicle will be used for destination camping trips as well as local daily activities. The lift-equipped bus will transport 100 individuals living with paralysis annually, including 15-20 United States military personnel and veterans living with paralysis. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 20 percent of the total project cost).

Community Foundation of North Central Wisconsin
Wausau, WI
$12,195 – Accessible Playground/Ball Field
This Quality of Life grant will help to support JoJo's Jungle, an inclusive outdoor playground that brings together children of any ability, along with their friends and families, in a safe, enriching environment that promotes physical fitness, social skills, and enhances sensory learning. This is the only accessible playground in Wausau, Wisconsin, with the nearest accessible playground over 45 minutes away. Grant funds will help to support two accessible zip lines. It is expected that this project will benefit 21,000 individuals of all ages and ability levels and their families in this medically underserved area. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds .5 percent of the total project cost).

Community Health & Wellness Partners of Logan County
West Liberty, OH
$10,193 – Healthcare
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Whole Health—Whole Person, an initiative that will provide accessible examination equipment for individuals with mobility challenges at this nonprofit comprehensive community health clinic in rural Ohio, which is a Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) to approximately 10,000 patients and operates at two locations within the boundaries of Logan County, Ohio. Grant funds will support the purchase of a wheelchair scale and a power examination table. Both of these pieces of equipment are critical to be able to provide essential health services to individuals with paralysis. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 100 percent of the total project cost).

Compassionate Friends Therapeutic Riding Center
Medford, NJ
$5,695 – Therapeutic Horseback Riding
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the purchase of one Independent Strides Independence Saddle for the therapeutic riding program for riders with traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury. The saddle has proven to be very successful in significantly improving the quality of the riding experience for individuals with severe physical impairments. This equipment is exceptionally suitable for therapeutic riding for several reasons. The saddle is extremely versatile—it can be used with any combination of the twelve attachments, or alone (simply the base saddle) which gives equestrian therapists the capability to completely individualize the saddle by first assessing each rider's needs, then adjusting and/or removing the components in order to maximize therapeutic benefits. It is also surprisingly light weight and easy to use. Further, the saddle is equipped with safety features that enable riders to be easily released from the saddle in an emergency. In the initial project year, the equipment will impact 5 individuals with paralysis-causing conditions, and will continue to impact more individuals in the future. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 100 percent of the total project cost).

Cook Inlet Native Head Start (CINHS)
Anchorage, AK
$5,000 – Accessible Playground/Ball Field
This Quality of Life grant will help to support an initiative to make Anchorage's largest Village Playground accessible in order to remedy the problems of lack of cultural connection, exercise, and repairs at the existing playground. As the only tribal Head Start for the Anchorage area, CINHS's purpose is to ensure the continuity of Tribal Early Head Start/Head Start programs and services for nearly 400 Alaska Native and American Indian (AN/AI) children and their families living in Anchorage, Alaska. The existing CINHS playground will be rebuilt as an exciting, new, traditional, and modern Alaska Native village. The playground will have traditional dwellings from the three main cultural groups of Alaska: Southeast, Eskimo, and Athabaskan. There will be a traditional fish camp, and land and water transportation. Modern play structures will also represent what modern villages are like with a clinic, store, post office, snowmobile, four wheeler, and biplane. A skiff in a river will be available for students who want to fish for wooden fish, which they can cut at the splitting table. A mountain range will divide the Early Head Start playground from the Head Start side (mandated by regulations). Teachers and students will better connect with cultural content and this will inspire pride in the students. CINHS is in a unique position to provide strong cultural foundations for Alaska Native children in all areas of school. Grant funds will support wheelchair accessible playground equipment. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 1 percent of the total project cost).

D - I

Des Moines Rowing Club
Des Moines, IA
$8,776 – Adaptive Sports
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the DMRC Adaptive Membership Initiative (AMI), which offers the sport of rowing to athletes who are not able to row in standard rowing shells (boats). It provides boats and equipment that allow for adaptation to meet the needs of athletes with both physical and mental challenges. Adaptive rowing requires a 4:1 volunteer-to-athlete ratio plus durable equipment that will last more than 10 years. Currently the club offers a “Learn to Row Day“ as community outreach. In order to offer this same outreach to the adaptive rowing community, the proper equipment required is an adapted double shell, which allows an experienced rower to row with and support an inexperienced rower. Three adaptive rowing clinics with up to five participants at each event or “Para-Learn to Row“ days will be offered every summer to the VA Hospital and other adaptive athletic groups. The intent of these clinics is to give people a one-time, on-water rowing experience before they consider joining the program or just for the fun of it. In order to reach a broader base of individuals with spinal cord injuries, a shell that accommodates 2 individuals is required. Each rower with impairment will be accompanied by a seasoned rower who gently coaches them on the finer points of rowing, while a safety launch accompanies them in the event of a mishap. Clinics will be publicized to current partners at the Department of Veterans Affairs-Central Iowa Healthcare System, United Spinal Association (Iowa Chapter) and Paralyzed Veterans of America (Iowa Chapter) before expanding to other interested groups. The optimum months for rowing in Iowa are June, July and August, so one-day clinic in each of these months will be offered. Three-fourths of the active adaptive membership are athletes with spinal cord injuries. Rowing is a perfect complement to other wheelchair activities; a direct benefit is that it strengthens the core. In addition to the double shell, safe adaptive rowing requires: pontoons attached to the rigging to stabilize the boat; four oars to propel the boat; fixed seats that safely strap a person with paralysis into the boat to keep them secure; personal flotation devices for safety; and Active Sport gloves if a person's hand grip has been compromised. At the club-level of rowing, equipment tends to be very long-lived. It is not uncommon for shells to be used for 10-20 years. With regular maintenance, it is anticipated that the adaptive shells will have similarly long use and accommodate many future adaptive rowers both as members and day clinic participants. Grant funds will support the purchase of the double shell, four paddles, and two personal flotation devices. It is expected that this project will impact 150 individuals with spinal cord injury and other paralysis-causing conditions and their families will be impacted by this project. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 90 percent of the total project cost).

Determined2Heal, Inc.
Potomac, MD
$10,886 – Adaptive Sports
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Moving Forward With Adventurous Wheels, a program that provides recreational opportunities for individuals with paralysis to transform the way that they and the world see paralysis. The outings empower individuals to get outside of their comfort zone and to learn firsthand that with the right attitude and creativity, almost anything is possible. Sponsoring rehabilitative adventures helps alleviate financial barriers and fosters much-needed happy memories for people with paralysis and their families. Determined2Heal partners with a variety of organizations to conduct the activities, including (but not limited to): The Impossible Dream accessible catamaran (based at Shake-A-Leg Miami) to sponsor sailing trips along the eastern coast of the United States; Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore, Maryland to recruit children with paralysis for sailing excursions; Life Rolls On (based in Marina Del Ray, California) for adaptive surfing in Virginia Beach, Virginia, and Blue Ridge Adaptive Snow Sports (BRASS) in Carroll Valley, Pennsylvania for skiing and snowboarding. Grant funds will support adaptive fishing equipment; rental of adaptive snow ski equipment and travel expenses; activity fees for fishing, glider runs, miniature golf, IndyCar, surfing, and skydiving. At least 110 individuals with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this program. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 44 percent of the total project cost).

Dignity Now, Inc.
Branson, MO
$4,386 – Physical/Occupational Therapy
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the MOVE (Mobility Opportunities via Education / Experience) therapy program for children and adults with developmental disabilities. MOVE is an activity-based program that combines natural body mechanics with an instructional process designed to help people acquire increasing amounts of motor skills needed for sitting, standing, walking and transitioning. The MOVE program literally “moves“ an individual from a position of dependency to interaction with, and control of, his or her environment. By maximizing an individual's abilities and adequately training parents, agency and school personnel and health care professionals to use specialized equipment, ordinary household items and regular daily activities, the mobility and overall well-being of these individuals can be improved. Grant funds will support the purchase of a Rifton TRAM which will be used as an assistive device for gait training, sit-to-stand transfers and seated transfers with optional thigh supports, walking saddle and forearm supports. This project expects to impact 150 individuals of all ages that have paralysis-causing conditions including spinal cord injury, spina bifida, cerebral palsy, and muscular dystrophy. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 26 percent of the total project cost).

DIRECT Center for Independence
Tucson, AZ
$16,119 – Advocacy Initiative
This Quality of Life grant will help to support a training, advocacy, and social change project will enhance the quality of life for individuals with paralysis and other disabilities (consumers) and their support networks in Tucson by addressing the widespread lack of accessibility and voluntary compliance with the ADA Title III. The initiative will implement practical solutions to this community problem by: (a) training individuals with paralysis and other disabilities as effective self-advocates on accessibility under ADA Title III; (b) empowering self-advocates to become community leaders in outreach and education on accessibility; (c) organizing consumer-advocates to assist in training business owners/operators on the ADA and creative options to increase accessibility; (d) influencing businesses to proactively make changes to architecture, the physical environment, and/or operations to increase access and comply with the ADA; and (e) organizing community partners to develop an advocacy plan aimed at closing the gap between city building code and ADA standards. The initiative will not only result in increased accessibility and compliance with ADA Title III but also enhanced collaboration among disability organizations and businesses and empowerment of individuals with disabilities to advocate for positive community change. A series of trainings will be conducted for individuals with paralysis, other disabilities, and families and caregivers on: the history of disability rights movement and the importance of advocacy, ADA basics, rights and responsibilities under Title III; how to conduct a basic assessment; advocacy and leadership styles; what to do when encountering barriers (exploring options and setting short- and long-term goals); advocating for civil rights; and community organizing to influence social change. Using DIRECT's peer mentoring model, the project will coach and support consumer-advocates who want to take on leadership roles in advocacy, training, and/or community organizing. Further, the project will train businesses on Title III of the ADA, their obligations, tax credits available, etc. An employer network will be established that promotes best practices in access and hiring people with disabilities. Finally, the project will Work with community partners and the city of Tucson to reconcile gaps between local building code and ADA standards. Grant funds will support program personnel, Spanish interpreter, para transit costs for mentoring, and stipends for 8 consumer advocate leaders. It is expected that this project will impact 50 individuals with paralysis and their families. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 54 percent of the total project cost).

discapacitados abriéndose caminos
South Saint Paul, MN
$3,200 – Facility Accessibility Modifications
discapacitados abriéndose caminos (d.a.c.) provides information and support to Latino families who have children, youth and adults with any kind of disability, so they will be more knowledgeable about their needs and their rights and responsibilities under the ADA. Many Latino families are dealing not only with the disability-related issues of their children, youth and adults with special needs, but also with a whole host of issues related to the challenges of poverty and linguistic and cultural diversity. Even though there other organizations that provide Spanish services, d.a.c. provides unduplicated services. The families served receive culturally and linguistically appropriate information and emotional support to help them to gain skills to parent their child with a disability more effectively, and to participate as partners in educational and other decision-making for their sons/daughters with disabilities. They receive and benefit from individual assistance and support to help them access services and advocate for themselves and their sons and daughters. They participate in a supportive environment with other parents, and develop mutually supportive connections among themselves. All services are provided in their native language. d.a.c. moved locations and is now housed in a building which does not have a ramp. While individuals in wheelchairs have been able to access the offices once inside the building, they cannot enter the building without assistance. This Quality of Life grant will help to fund a ramp that will enable individuals that use wheelchairs to enter the building independently. It is expected that this project will impact 10 individuals with paralysis and their families. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 4 percent of the total project cost).

Dream Catcher of Los Angeles

Los Angeles, CA
$4,445 – Therapeutic Horseback Riding
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the purchase of an Equicizer, a non-motorized mechanical horse that offers the unique ability to experience the benefits of therapeutic horseback riding without the horse. The Equicizer is designed with a spring balanced system that allows for safe scaling to the rider's ability and strength. Riders will be able to maintain a sense of comfort and control while building important muscle groups and gaining confidence through accomplishment. The Equicizer's design also allows instructors and volunteers to work in close proximity to the rider, according to their needs. Capable of carrying a weight of up to 500 pounds, the Equicizer can accommodate both child and adult riders with a variety of skill levels and disabilities. By incorporating the Equicizer into the existing programs and therapies, the center will be able to increase the quality of care provided for clients. The Equicizer will be used as an alternative therapy for riders who do not want to or cannot ride a full-size horse. The Equicizer will also be used as an alternative when weather prevents outdoor riding. Currently, Dream Catcher serves 80 riders with four programs: therapeutic (adaptive) horseback riding, Equine Assisted Learning, Equine Assisted Psychotherapy, and Horses for Forces. At this time, approximately a quarter of riders have some degree of paralysis. In the next calendar year, a 20% growth across all four programs is anticipated. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 100 percent of the total project cost).

Easter Seals Eastern PA
Allentown, PA
$5,634 – Durable Medical Equipment
This Quality of Life grant will support an outpatient clinic for children with disabilities which offers physical, occupational and speech therapies that are designed to help children develop new skills and improve their overall level of functioning. Therapy is critical in diagnosing, training and managing a plethora of developmental disabilities and neuromuscular, congenital, skeletal and acquired disorders. Each year, Easter Seals' outpatient therapy and specialized clinics serve more than 500 children with disabilities at the organization's Berks County office. Dozens of consumers pass through the doors every day to receive therapy and consult with orthopedic and neurologic specialists. One of the benefits of receiving outpatient therapy services from Easter Seals is the nurturing, community environment that is wholly focused on helping children with disabilities reach their fullest potential. Two of the most utilized pieces of therapy equipment at Easter Seals are the supine stander and therapy tables. The supine stander gives children who spend much of their time in a wheelchair or other adaptive seating, the opportunity to be in a standing position, which can improve digestion, respiration and circulatory system function. Therapeutic positioning using a stander or therapy table is extremely beneficial and greatly improves the quality of life. Through positioning, the body can naturally stabilize and align. This can help a child develop a full range of motion to better perform independent living activities, and it also prevents muscle contractures that make it much more difficult to stand and walk. Grant funds will support the purchase of a supine stander with accessories and a therapy table. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 92 percent of the total project cost).

Elmwood Health Center
Williamsville, NY
$5,832 – Healthcare
Elmwood Health Center, located in a medically underserved area, is one of two clinics in Buffalo that provides health care tailored to patients with developmental disabilities. High quality services available at the Elmwood Health Center include: Pediatric and Adult Medicine, Gynecology, Podiatry, Audiometry, Physiatry, Social Work, Psychiatry, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, and Speech Therapy. Grant funds will help to support the purchase of a Midmark IQecg (electrocardiogram) and IQspiro (spirometer) to assess heart and lung function. These would replace current equipment that has been working sporadically over time. And, the most recent Electronic Medical Record (EMR) upgrade is no longer compatible with the system. New digital ECG/Spirometry equipment from Midmark would be reliable and would interface directly with the Electronic Medical Records, providing state-of-the-art electrocardiograms and spirometry directly to the physicians to detect defects and disease in heart/lung function, in real-time, for patients. This is very important in working with individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities that may have difficulty communicating health issues and in whom symptoms of significant chronic diseases (including heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, etc.) often go unrecognized. It is expected that 100 individuals, ages 13 years old and above, that have paralysis-causing conditions will be impacted by this projects. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 100 percent of the total project cost).

Excel Employment Options
Howell, MI
$5,000 – Employment Programs
Transportation remains one of the biggest barriers to community integration for people with disabilities, especially in rural areas. Excel Employment Options gets people, particularly those with the most severe impairments and barriers, out of the institutions and sheltered workshops, and into the community where they can participate and live inclusive, productive lives. Accredited through the Commission on Accreditation for Rehabilitative Facilities (CARF) for the past 15 years, Excel now serves 300 people between Livingston County and Oakland County, and has a structured plan for continued growth. Excel services are unique in the fact that they are community based, with no in-house shelter or workshop. They work with each individual to find community employment and training opportunities unique to their individual skills and interests. This Quality of Life grant will to support a wheelchair accessible community van that will help transport clients with paralysis into the community for employment assistance, transition, and community skill building services. This project is expected to impact 8 individuals with paralysis. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 10 percent of the total project cost).

GIVE Medical Ministry of The New Path, Inc.
Covington, OH
$5,700 –Durable Medical Equipment
GIVE Medical Ministry has been providing free used refurbished durable medical equipment to individuals in need since 1997. In 2007, GIVE Medical Ministry became one of the twelve ministries of New Path, a nonprofit organization. Almost no donations of pediatric equipment are made, but numerous requests for equipment and supplies that are designed specifically for children are received every month. Unfortunately, these individuals cannot be served with the current equipment inventory and there are no other area agencies providing these services to which they can be sent. Grant funds will help to establish a pediatric section of services that will include the following equipment that has been identified as most beneficial for children with paralysis: an EasyStand sit-to-stander; a Skillbuilders pediatric anterior gait trainer; 4 Medline pediatric wheelchairs, a Wenzelite young adult posture walker; 2 Wenzelite youth posture walkers; and 2 Ergobaum junior shock absorber crutches. The primary goal of this project is to provide pediatric equipment that will increase each child's mobility, thus allowing the child and their family to experience everyday life with fewer restrictions and greater involvement. Equipment will be loaned to families with the expectation that it be returned when no longer needed. It is expected that this project will impact 100 children with paralysis and their families. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 100 percent of the total project cost).

Global Abilities Foundation
Philadelphia, PA
$2,500 – Adaptive Sports
This Quality of Life grant will help to support The 2017 Rec Fest, a series of inclusive recreation festivals that feature adapted sports (wheelchair rugby, handcycling, wheelchair tennis, golf, martial arts, wheelchair basketball), general recreation activities (art, scuba diving, gardening), and resources for school, work, play, and other aspects of life. Through each Rec Fest, Global Abilities helps hundreds of people of all ages and abilities become more physically active; helps organizations connect with the persons they want to serve, and educates the public about the needs and capabilities of persons with disabilities. Each Rec Fest brings together over three dozen organizations providing disability resources in one event. Persons with disabilities can engage in many activities in a free event at a convenient location accessible by public transportation. Global Abilities works closely with the Mayor's Commissions on Disabilities and the Departments of Parks and Recreation in Philadelphia and Baltimore to plan each city's respective Rec Fest. Rehabilitation partners in these two cities include Magee Rehabilitation, Moss Rehab, Good Shepherd Penn Partners, and Kennedy Krieger Institute. Global Abilities has been asked to host a third event in Harrisburg, PA, in 2017. This Rec Fest will serve the cities of Gettysburg, Harrisburg, Hershey, Lancaster, Reading, York, and their surrounding areas in Pennsylvania. Penn State University's Harrisburg campus has agreed to host the Harrisburg Rec Fest, and Penn State Hershey Rehabilitation Hospital is confirmed as the primary sponsor. GAF will reach out to other organizations that serve individuals with paralysis in the region to coordinate the Harrisburg Rec Fest. It is projected that over 80 organizations will participate in the three 2017 Rec Fest events. Grant funds will support the purchase of a sports wheelchair. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 3 percent of the total project cost).

Goodwill Industries of Denver
Denver, CO
$14,000 – Employment Program
This Quality of Life grant will help to support AgrAbility SCI Workshops, a series of 10-15 free educational workshops in rural farming and ranching communities throughout the state, presented to agricultural families and the professionals who work with them. These workshops are critical to reaching and educating individuals who are working to maintain livelihoods in agriculture while living with a disability. AgrAbility workshops educate those with disabilities, their families and caregivers, and the professionals that work with them, about the physical, emotional, and cognitive issues they may be facing; ways to adapt farm and ranch operations to accommodate needs; and resources available to help agricultural families with a disability remain independent, self-sufficient, and successful in their livelihoods. Workshops also include sessions for professionals working with agricultural families living with a disability, and provide opportunities to inform and coordinate resources between families and professionals. Workshops have been regularly attended in local communities by professionals in occupational and physical therapy, assisted living centers, local law enforcement, health care services, and the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation. Workshop topics are tailored toward specific disabilities that are commonly seen in the farming and ranching community, and toward common issues that these individuals face, including adaptive equipment, mental health, social security, estate planning, injury education, and funding available to meet physical, emotional, or cognitive needs. Another important aspect of each AgrAbility workshop is peer support. Workshops provide opportunities for farmers and ranchers facing similar challenges to share ideas, offer and receive support, and connect to local support groups, coalitions, and activities that take place throughout the year. Workshops also include separate breakout sessions for caretakers and family members of those living with a disability, with topics tailored specifically to the challenges they may face and resources available to them. Finally, AgrAbility workshops also include the participation of individuals who are successfully working in agriculture with a disability, as these individuals serve as guest speakers and lead breakout sessions at each workshop. Grant funds will help to support a focus on spinal cord injury by conducting three educational workshops in rural Colorado communities during January, February, and March 2017, tailored specifically for those living with SCI and working in agriculture. Requested funds will cover expenses for participants to travel to workshops, lodging during their stay, childcare or livestock care assistance stipends (critical for some families to be able to travel away from their farm or ranch), meeting space, and workshop materials. Goodwill estimates that 90 individuals will attend these three SCI workshops, and that an additional 5,000 individuals will be reached through outreach efforts to promote the workshop, and will be made aware of AgrAbility services available in their local community. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 9 percent of the total project cost).

Haiti Rehab Project
Vernon Center, NY
$8,000 – Physical/Occupational Therapy
The mission of the Haiti Rehab Project is to support rehabilitation and medical clinics, orphanages, families, and outreach programs for those with special needs in Haiti. In 2012, the organization's founder volunteered as a physical therapist at a hospital in Port-Au-Prince. There she learned of the tremendous challenges those with disabilities experience in a country with limited medical and rehabilitation resources and was inspired to establish the Haiti Rehab Project. From time spent with individuals with amputations and spinal cord injuries in Haiti, the organization learned of their challenges with discrimination, difficulties with transportation, and inability to find work to provide for their families. Understanding the importance of promoting employment and quality of life activities, they opened a shop, supplying a work-space for those with disabilities, and provided training to make canes and walkers out of PVC pipe. Next, woodworking training programs were initiated, while building items for the planned rehab clinic. Mobile clinics were used, and the PVC devices were provided to many with no access to rehabilitation services. In January of 2016, the Centre of Rehabilitation de Artibonite in Gonaives was opened in order to serve those who previously had no access to rehabilitation services. As expected, the volume of patients served increases each month. By January 1, 2017, it is anticipated that the clinic will be operational 5 days per week, seeing at least 200 visitors per month. A conservative projection of 2,000 total patient visits per year is anticipated. Grant funds will help to support the contracted reimbursement for rehabilitation services provided for people with disabilities who cannot afford to pay for them in clinic and during mobile clinics. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 14 percent of the total project cost).

Handi-Wheels Transportation, Inc.
Fargo, ND
$1,858 – Employment Program
Handi-Wheels Transportation began over 40 years ago through a grassroots effort by individuals using wheelchairs and their families to purchase a wheelchair accessible van. Throughout its history, in addition to providing rides to people with disabilities, Handi-Wheels has also had people with disabilities volunteering and working in its office as well as serving on its board. Throughout its 41-year history as a nonprofit organization, people who have disabilities have been a vital part of its operations. Handi-Wheels currently operates out of space that is donated by the New Horizons, which is part of Fargo public housing and is a fully accessible building. The space is small, and does not adequately accommodate office staff and volunteers that use wheelchairs, particularly if there is more than one wheelchair user working in the space at a time. Manual height adjustable workstations would allow wheelchair access for ADA compliance, and will provide ergonomic comfort that reduces fatigue and prevents overuse injuries. Having height-adjusted workstations, desks, and tables will help to protect staff and volunteers from overuse injuries, eye strain, and back issues. Handi-Wheels would like all of its staff and volunteers to have easy access to all necessary tools required in the office environment. Handi-Wheels wants to accommodate its staff and volunteers of various needs and abilities with adjustable-height tables that are motorized and some that lift by hand crank or knob. Plus, optional accessories like a wire management system and an adjustable keyboard arm will make it easier for staff and volunteers that use wheelchairs to work comfortably. Every person deserves an accessible, comfortable spot to work, and having wheelchair accessible desks and tables will suit each person's special needs in the office. Grant funds will help to support ergonomic wheelchair accessible work stations. This project is expected to impact 6 adults that have paralysis-causing conditions. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 18 percent of the total project cost).

HelpHOPELive
Radnor, PA
$2,500 – Healthcare
HelpHOPELive is a national nonprofit that supports community-based fundraising for people with unmet medical and related expenses due to cell and organ transplants or catastrophic injuries and illnesses. HelpHOPELive helps patients and families overcome financial barriers to transplantation and catastrophic injury through grass-roots community fundraising campaigns that enable the families to fundraise without fearing loss of their benefits. This Quality of Life grant will help to support a Hispanic initiative that will enable Spanish speakers who seek a community-based approach to fundraising to help finance their medical and related expenses. A marketing campaign will be launched in areas with high levels of Spanish-speaking individuals, and staff will travel to transplant and rehabilitation centers in Spanish-speaking communities. These efforts will be supported by a translated version of website and printed materials, and the temporary usage of a telephone translation service to serve Spanish speakers until hiring a new full-time staff bilingual professional to serve as a Patient Service Coordinator, who will assist Spanish-speaking clients in customizing a personal fundraising campaign, perfectly tailored to their needs and community. Grant funds will support the cost of a translation service to generate Spanish versions of website and print materials. An estimated 85 individuals with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 4 percent of the total project cost).

Herkimer ARC
Herkimer, NY
$6,600 – Accessible Playground/Ball Field
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the Mohawk Valley Region Accessible Recreation Park, a collaboration between the Village of Herkimer and the Herkimer ARC, to transform contiguous properties owned by each into a totally accessible recreation experience attractive to children and families of all ages and abilities in a 10-county region throughout the Mohawk Valley and Central New York. The Recreation Park will feature the following elements: exercise stations for all ages; fitness path; municipal pool renovated for accessibility; renovated basketball court and athletic field; bocce pavilion; picnic pavilion; bandstand; and adult seating at play areas. When complete, the facility will be the only park in the region to have all these fully accessible features. Grant funds will support one piece of a five-piece fitness course apparatus that includes a two-person accessible chest press, accessible butterfly, two-person accessible vertical press, four-person leg press, and four-person lower body combo. impact 11,400 individuals of all ages and abilities and their families. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds .4 percent of the total project cost).

I Believe, Inc.
Montclair, NJ
$3,000 – Media Development
I Believe TV serves the paralysis community locally, nationally and worldwide, via public access television and online. In 2004 Richard Gaskin, known as Professir X, was invited to the Cure Paralysis Now Rally in Washington, DC. He was asked to perform a song he wrote called Forever Superman, a tribute to Christopher Reeve. A collection of friends and family captured the events on video, which included Dana Reeve speaking on stage at the rally. Upon returning to his home and going through the footage, he discovered there were no media outlets on television about the event or information he had gathered. Understanding the importance this information would be to others, he and his peers decided to contact local access television to attempt to deliver the information they captured. A quick return call was made to him and he began editing shows for Public Access television. I Believe TV captures information of those who provide resources for individuals with paralysis and bring this information to those living with paralysis through community, media and social interactions, helping to fill the common void within today's information platforms that rarely show people living with spinal cord injuries what resources are available to them--particularly helping to reach minority and underserved communities. I Believe TV is an open forum of many organizations, exhibitors of Abilities Expos and those developing cures and technologies to improve the Quality of life of people living with paralysis. An element of the project will be to create a catalog of accessible places in local communities, so that people know what to expect and can better plan activities in their community. Grant funds will support production costs including a professional memory video card, premium Soft Floors Interlocking Tile Mats (for studio sound proofing), fluorescent green Rosco Chroma Key Paint and ProTapes Pro Chroma Cloth Tape (to create green screen), and a contracted production assistant that will prepare the studio set, set up camera equipment, drive, and provide physical labor for a duration of 15-20 show recordings. This project is expected to impact 20,000 individuals of all ages with paralysis and their families. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 100 percent of the total project cost).

Indian Waters Council, Boy Scouts of America
Columbia, SC
$5,304 – Facility Accessibility Modifications
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Camp Barstow for All: Increasing Accessibility to All Activities, an accessibility initiative that will make one of the most popular Boy Scout Camps in the southeast more accessible for Scouts with paralysis. Located on the shores of Lake Murray in Saluda County, South Carolina near the metropolitan area of Columbia, it's easily accessible, yet feels like miles away. The 300-acre camp offers a wide variety of traditional camp activities, with an emphasis on waterfront activities (boating, swimming, fishing), shooting sports (rifle, sporting clays and archery) and high adventure (sailing, survival skills, high ropes course & treks). It is used by Boy Scouts, faith-based youth groups, schools, and even the Department of Juvenile Justice. The camp serves over 2,000 youth in the summer, and another 1,800 during the rest of the year. In 2017, an additional 1,500 youth and their families will participate in a special regional camping event, with Scouts coming from Florida, Georgia & North Carolina as well as South Carolina. About 10% of participants need modifications or accommodations to participate in camp activities, and staff and volunteers are trained by the Boy Scouts of America to make all of program activities accessible to all youth. Grant funds will support 2 beach mats that will enable wheelchair access on the beach; an accessible gate, 2 aluminum threshold ramps, and supplies for a wheelchair accessible Adirondack shelter. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 23 percent of the total project cost).

Infinite Flow - A Wheelchair Dance Company
Sherman Oaks, CA
$6,000 – Arts Program
This Quality of Life grants program will help to support Infinite Flow Kids, a dance education and outreach program intended to engage kids with and without paralysis in wheelchair ballroom dancing and other forms of commercial dance, such as hip hop and contemporary dance. The existing weekly program “Infinite Flow Kids Dance Company“ meets weekly in two separate groups for class and rehearsal for one hour each. Some kids meet in smaller groups outside of the regular rehearsal for solos as well as experimenting with their own choreography. In order for more kids from different regions to participate, this project will recruit 15 additional dancers with disabilities and 15 contemporaries who are not disabled. Quality of Life grant funding will support instructional costs. There are no fees for participants. All dancers in the Infinite Flow Kids Dance Company are given scholarships, as are their siblings, who are encouraged to participate. Curriculum will include ballroom and hip hop dance for all. Contemporary, improvisation, and choreography will be added for the upper levels. The kids will have the opportunity to showcase their work at various community events and media opportunities. Participant kids and families become part of the Infinite Flow community and form a social and support network. It is estimated that 75 dancers with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 12 percent of the total project cost).

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Jacob's Chance
Richmond, VA
$10,850 – Adapted Sports
Jacob's Chance is the parent company for River City Buddy Ball, which is in its 7th year of operation. The mission of this program is to promote wellness through exercise and establish relationships between participants with disabilities and peer and adult volunteers through athletic programs. River City Buddy Ball began with a baseball program and has added cheer-leading, tennis, soccer, basketball, surfing, and flag football over the past two years in a suburban location near Richmond. This Quality of Life grant will support the Athletics for All adapted sports program, which will expand the sports programs to offer the programs to lower income residents of the City of Richmond by hosting sporting seasons in locations that are near to accessible public transportation. Initially, baseball and basketball will be offered, followed by the addition of soccer, flag football, tennis, and teen social programs. Grant funds will support staff that will coordinate program logistics, outreach and recruitment, as well as the following equipment: baseball bats, gloves, and balls; flag football supplies and audible balls; adjustable hoops; portable wheelchair ramp for accessibility/ gait assistance/bowling push; 2 sports wheelchairs; soccer balls and goals; and tennis ball machine, balls, and racquets. It is expected that this project will impact 114 individuals with paralysis, ages 5-24 years old, that have conditions such as stroke, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury, acquired brain injury, spinal cord injury, muscular dystrophy, spina bifida, and spinal muscular atrophy. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 39 percent of the total project cost).

Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government Parks and Recreation
Lexington, KY
$7,800 – Adaptive Sports
This grant will help to fund Back to the Bluegrass - Bringing Back Wheelchair Hoops, an initiative that will restore recreational wheelchair basketball in Central Kentucky. Therapeutic Recreation (TR) has been part of the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government (LFUCG) Division of Parks and Recreation programming for more than 30 years and the TR program is one of three in the state of Kentucky offered through a Parks and Recreation division. In 2015, 296 individuals, experiencing varying levels of disability, attended TR programs and camps. TR serves Fayette and surrounding Central Kentucky counties and participants range in age from eight to 64. Community activities are age appropriate and designed for integration into and socialization within the community at large. For more than 30 years, LFUCG and Cardinal Hill Rehabilitation Hospital supported basketball teams for persons with disabilities. The LFUCG Division of Parks and Recreation had competitive teams and hosted the Bluegrass Wheelchair Invitational Tournament for 32 years. As many as 28 teams from the region would participate in the tournament. Unfortunately, budget cuts that appeared in 2012 caused the tournament to leave Lexington and move to Louisville, and teams dispersed or disbanded. This Quality of Life grant will support the purchase of three basketball wheelchairs for the recreational basketball program, bringing wheelchair basketball back to Central Kentucky and impacting 45 individuals ages 5 years and older with paralysis caused by conditions including spina bifida, cerebral palsy, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, and arthrogryposis. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 76 percent of the total project cost).

Lions Camp Tatiyee, Inc.
Lakeside, AZ
$6,612 – Facility Accessibility Modifications
Lions Camp Tatiyee is the only organization in Arizona that provides individuals with special needs the opportunity to spend six days and five nights away from home in the White Mountains, enjoying activities and meeting new friends, entirely free-of-charge. Lions Camp Tatiyee has provided this unique experience to special needs families in Arizona since 1958, and generations of campers have gained newfound independence and confidence that comes with trying new activities and challenging personal limits. When the camp is operating at full capacity of 72 campers per week, Lions Camp Tatiyee can host approximately 600 campers per season, ages 5 to 90+ years old. Lions Camp Tatiyee has had a pool lift since the original pool was installed in the late 1990's, but it was used to the point that it no longer operates safely. The loss of this tool in utilizing the pool has reduced the capacity to serve less mobile campers unable to comfortably transition into the pool. This Quality of Life grant will support the installation of a pool lift that will allow a comfortable method by which campers that use wheelchairs (approximately 80+ per season) may enter the pool safely, more independently and with dignity. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 94 percent of the total project cost).

Margaret E. Moul Home
York, PA
$2,275 – Assistive Technology Initiative
This Quality of Life grant will help to support a project that will bring environmental control technology to adults that have a variety of conditions including cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, spina bifida and traumatic brain injuries. This technology will help each person function more independently by controlling his or her TV, radio, lights, computer, telephone and call light in his or her own room, as well as the building's elevators, increasing self-esteem and self-worth and maintaining and/or increasing functional and cognitive abilities. This Quality of Life grant will support 5 eye-gaze environmental control unit systems. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 1 percent of the total project cost).

Mary Free Bed Rehabilitation Hospital
Grand Rapids, MI
$9,986 – Adaptive Sports
Mary Free Bed Rehabilitation Hospital is one of only 25 hospitals in the United States dedicated solely for the purpose of providing comprehensive, specialized rehabilitative services for individuals with physical disabilities. Last year, Mary Free Bed served approximately 260 patients with paralysis-causing conditions. As this number increases, so does the need for specialized rehabilitation and healthy outlets such as adaptive sports. Mary Free Bed strives to better serve patients by expanding the programs and services offered through the Recreational Therapy Program. That expansion includes the addition of the Downhill Adaptive Handcycle Program. Currently, no hospital or organization in Michigan offers an adaptive program that allows individuals with spinal cord injuries to ride bikes on non-paved trails. With the purchase of the Sport-on, Fat [Tire] Explorer 3 Handcycle, Mary Free Bed Recreational Therapy will offer a brand new adaptive sports clinic to hundreds of patients presently part of the program and to patients for years to come, and will develop and offer Michigan's first and only adaptive downhill and off-road handcycle program. The Downhill Adaptive Handcycle Program will be offered to both inpatients and outpatients, and clinics will be held train patients on the equipment. It is expected that 520 individuals with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 99 percent of the total project cost).

Memorial Hospital
South Bend, IN
$7,200 – Durable Medical Equipment
Memorial Hospital is the only verified trauma center in north central Indiana, and provides care for persons in the region who sustain acute spinal cord injury. From 2011-2015, 84 patients were admitted with acute spinal cord injury, with an average of 16.8 patients annually (median 17). The population has grown 75%. This Quality of Life grant will help to support Let's Get Moving: Early Aggressive Rehab to Improve Quality of Life, the purpose of which is to achieve "sooner & safer" mobilization of patients after acute spinal cord injury. This project will help to minimize the negative systemic effects of prolonged immobility for all patients served in the ICU and their families. In 2016, an interdisciplinary team comprising physicians, nurses, patient care assistants, and physical/occupational/speech therapists implemented an early mobility initiative in the ICU for all patients. The specific objective is to achieve movement from bed within 24 hours of medical stability. Medical stability is defined in terms of cardiovascular, oxygenation, and neuro stability without support of medications. This project will focus extending early mobility for patients with acute spinal cord injury. Early mobilization can decrease the incidence of respiratory complications, bowel complications, pressure injuries and deep vein thrombosis due to immobility and decreased muscular tone. The negative effects of bedrest can also delay the rehabilitative process, especially if the patient cannot tolerate a vertical position. Through progressive mobility, patients can acclimate to an upright position to decrease orthostatic complications. Quality of Life grant funds will support the equipment needed for the program that is specific to patients of different sizes with acute spinal cord injury, and includes walking jackets and slings in different sizes, reclining wheelchairs in 2 different sizes, and Roho high profile cushions in 2 different sizes. It is expected that this project will impact 100 individuals, ages 13 and over, with acute spinal cord injury and their families. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 60 percent of the total project cost).

Miracle Flights for Kids
Green Valley, NV
$7,500 – Healthcare
Miracle Flights serves economically disadvantaged families facing life-threatening medical conditions, who need to travel to distant medical facilities for specialized care. Children and adults are flown from all 50 states to the best treatment centers in the nation for their needs. Unlike many other programs, Miracle Flights will provide transportation to qualifying families as often, and for as long, as is required. The funding requested will be used to coordinate travel arrangements and book commercial airline flights for families with an urgent medical need to travel for specialty care. Qualifying families can receive travel assistance for a child patient and up to 2 parents or legal guardians. In addition, flights are provided for adult patients and 1 caregiver if medically necessary. Eligibility includes income threshold, certification of need from the referring physician and appointment verification from the treatment site. This Quality of Life grant will help to support approximately 17 flights for children and adults who are battling rare medical disorders and disabilities and would otherwise lack access to specialized medical care. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 9 percent of the total project cost).

Mission to Assist and Provide for Seniors (MAPS Charities)

Newhall, CA
$6,800 – Durable Medical Equipment
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the Senior Mobility Project, which aims to increase access to mobility devices and related needs for low-income and high-risk senior citizens in the Los Angeles County area. The Senior Mobility Project will fund outreach to partner agencies and direct safety-net assistance to seniors in 2017. The Project strives to bolster independent living by helping seniors with mobility impairments to age in place with dignity. Clients are referred by case managers, physicians, discharge planners, and other eldercare professionals from over 20 partner agencies. Seniors must meet basic eligibility requirements: they must be at least 60 years of age and not have previously received assistance totaling over $500 from MAPS Charities. As part of the Senior Mobility Project, referrers will be required to specifically report their clients' paralyzing and mobility-impairing conditions, in an effort to increase understanding of this vulnerable population's needs and improve quality of life through assistive devices and beyond. It is evident even from existing data that clients who are able to afford wheelchairs, mobility scooters, walkers, and other durable equipment because they are covered by Medicare Part B cannot afford additional purchases that could dramatically impact their health and well-being. The project funding will be used to fulfill mobility-related requests submitted by eldercare professionals throughout Los Angeles on behalf of impoverished seniors under their care. Clients, their referrers, and MAPS staff will work together to purchase safe, effective, and size-appropriate durable medical equipment from local and online vendors. In the past year, approximately 10% of safety net funds granted by MAPS Charities were used for the purchase of items that increase mobility and accessibility, such as wheelchairs, ramps, and bathtub seats. Accordingly, the Senior Mobility Project funding will be used to increase the number of seniors with mobility needs served by MAPS Charities, more coherently assess their diverse needs, and ensure that these needs are met to the best of the agency's abilities. Grant funds will support durable medical equipment including wheelchairs, walkers, shower chairs, lift chairs, grab bars, and bedside commodes. It is estimated that 115 individuals over the age of 61 with a variety of paralysis-causing conditions will be impacted by this project. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 40 percent of the total project cost).

Montana Independent Living Project (MILP)
Helena, MT
$10,000 – Fitness and Wellness
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Out the Door and MORE!, designed to improve the health, wellness, and quality of life for people living with disabilities by eliminating barriers leading to social isolation. Out the Door and MORE! consists of three programs: RAMP (Readiness to Achieve Mobility and Parity), Evening & Weekend Accessible Transportation, and Travel Training. MILP's RAMP program will begin making ramps available (as inventory supply allows) to any community member living with a mobility disability. For many people, a single step may as well be the Grand Canyon, as they find themselves unable to exit or enter their home safely, if at all. Front steps suddenly become potential hazards for falls or obstacles that prevent a person from leaving safely in an emergency. RAMP will provide the means to access their yard, neighborhood, and community as a whole. MILP is partnering with QRamp (www.qramp.com), a manufacturer of access ramp systems that are designed for quick, easy assembly. QRamp has agreed to sell to MILP, at wholesale, their maintenance-free, movable alternatives to permanent wood ramps. This significant savings benefits the community by allowing MILP to provide more ramps for more people living with disabilities. The RAMP loaner program will install a ramp for any community member living with a mobility disability, regardless of their ability to pay, for as long as necessary. MILP will retain ownership of the ramp. If a person no longer requires its use, MILP will uninstall and make it available for another community member. However, if someone would prefer to purchase a QRamp system, MILP will sell them one. Any proceeds from the ramp sale will be reinvested into additional modular components for the loaner program. This begins to resolve the home-to-curb barrier. While a ramp itself may be considered a home modification, it is truly much, much more. It becomes the mechanism that allows someone living with a disability to actively participate in their neighborhood and community, thus leading to improved health, wellness, and a quality of life. Grant funds will help to support the purchase of QRamp product inventory. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 7 percent of the total project cost).

Music Conservatory of Westchester
White Plains, NY
$2,286 – Arts Program
This Quality of Life grant will support a music therapy program for individuals with cerebral palsy and other paralysis-causing conditions. The physical process of music-making has several important physical and emotional benefits for individuals with physical injuries, cerebral palsy and related conditions, including improved muscle control, sense of empowerment, stress reduction, and the joy of making music. Creating original music takes individual creativity to an unprecedented level, uncovering talent and offering an outlet for expressing a variety of thoughts and emotions. For individuals with cerebral palsy and other mobility impairments, the challenge of documenting their original compositions can be resolved through technology. Grant funds will help to support a computer and keyboard setup with composition software, and will facilitate a high level of music-making, including composing original music, and would also be used for the students to perform. The new computer and keyboard setup with composition software will offer many benefits to people with paralysis. For example, for someone who is paraplegic, the setup will provide a beneficial and therapeutic activity that can be done while sitting in a wheelchair, which is not true for many instruments. The use of the keyboard will offer recreation, learning, and creative expression. For children with cerebral palsy, using the keyboard will stimulate muscle development and increase strength. For veterans and others with TBI, this activity will help rebuild memory and cognitive functioning. The Conservatory organized a Veterans Band two years ago which is open to all veterans in the program. The band will use the technology set-up to write and arrange songs as a group. The proposed project is part of a plan to develop a keyboard technology lab consisting of eight student stations and a teacher station. The first work station with a new computer and keyboard setup will be housed temporarily in one of the existing classrooms until the keyboard lab is completed. Eight work stations will be in place by December 2017. Grant funds will support the full-size keyboard, pedals, student interface box, and workstation. This project is expected to impact 75 individuals, ages 5 years and up, that have conditions such as cerebral palsy, spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, spina bifida, and multiple sclerosis. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 2 percent of the total project cost).

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New Horizons, Inc.
Unionville, CT
$4,000 – Durable Medical Equipment
New Horizons Village is one of the largest apartment complexes in North America dedicated to independent living by persons with disabilities. This Quality of Life grant will support the purchase of a standing lift to assist with transfers of persons with limited or no mobility to a bed, chair, or for toileting needs, replacing a lift that had been regularly used for 14 years and had surpassed its safe usage. Eighty individuals will be impacted by this equipment. Individuals that reside at New Horizons Village are adults over the age of 19 that have paralysis-causing conditions including multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, spina bifida, stroke, and spinal cord injury. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 100 percent of the total project cost).

No Barriers, USA
Fort Collins, CO
$4,000 – Adapted Sports
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the 2017 No Barriers Summit, a 4-day intensive conference and exposition targeted to individuals with disabilities and their families. The Summit promotes innovation, education and assistive technologies that enable participants of all abilities and ages to discover the potential that lies within them. Through over 50 hands-on clinics (such as mountain biking, rock climbing, fly-fishing, art, etc.), expeditions, innovative demonstrations, adaptive activities and exercises, participants gain inspiration, insight and resolve which promotes community and independence, encourages inclusion, creates stronger family bonding and increase quality of life. Grant funds will support activity experts to facilitate clinics. It is expected that at least 80 individuals with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this grant. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds .5 percent of the total project cost).

Norton Healthcare Foundation
Louisville, KY
$11,220 – Fitness and Wellness
This Quality of Life grant will help to fund Neuro Tai Chi, a program specifically designed for people who are living with paralysis due to Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injuries, ALS, or stroke and their caregivers. This class meets twice a week throughout the year, with each class lasting 1-½ hours. Participants are expected to attend at least one full 12-week session and are encouraged to continue with the program, as because just as with any other form of exercise, Tai Chi should be practiced regularly to maintain its value. The class is conducted by a Tai Chi expert who has extensive experience working with people with these neurological conditions. The purpose of the Neuro Tai Chi class is to engage the minds and bodies of people with Parkinson's disease, MS, stroke, ALS, or spinal cord injuries and their caregivers through a community-building environment that not only improves balance, flexibility and focus, but also the overall positive mood of the patients. Neuro Tai Chi reduces stress, anxiety, and fatigue as it works towards a clearer and more relaxed mind and more positive outlook on their quality of life. Tai Chi is a low-impact activity suitable for people of all ages and all abilities, especially people with neurological conditions, as it places minimal stress on joints and muscles and as such, is far less likely than other forms of exercise to cause muscle soreness or injury due to its slow, flowing, graceful movements. The Neuro Tai Chi class is free of charge to patients and their caregivers. The class can accommodate up to 25 people with Parkinson's disease, MS, ALS, or spinal cord injuries as well as their caregivers. The current class has 25 participants, but there is a waiting list of 25 who have expressed interest in participating in this program. Grant funds will fund the Tai Chi expert. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 49 percent of the total project cost).

Old Dominion University Research Foundation
Norfolk, VA
$23,137 – Adaptive Sports
This Quality of Life grant will support the launch of the Mighty Monarchs Adapted Sports Program, a community-based adapted sports program for youth with physical and sensory disabilities. Held on the campus of Old Dominion University (ODU), this program will offer the opportunities that are not currently available in the Hampton Roads area for youth with physical and sensory disabilities to participate in adapted sports, including wheelchair basketball, wheelchair tennis and goalball, on a weekly basis throughout the school year, and will specifically target youth who are enrolled in urban school districts across the Hampton Roads area. Adult athletes with disabilities, including wounded veterans recruited from Naval Station Norfolk, the largest naval complex in the world, will be invited to participate in programming and mentor younger athletes, providing an important opportunity for the youth athletes to learn about their own abilities by seeing the successes of people like them. A secondary purpose of the Mighty Monarchs Adapted Sports Program will be to provide hands-on training opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students interested in related fields, such as those studying therapeutic recreation, physical education, and adapted physical education. Further, the Mighty Monarchs Adapted Sports Program will provide a forum for conducting research in the arenas of physical activity and health-related quality of life for individuals with physical and sensory disabilities. Currently, researchers have a limited understanding of how physical activity impacts individuals with physical and sensory disabilities and their families, especially related to quality of life. Although research is available pertaining to the impact adapted sport and physical activity have on adults with physical disabilities, little has been done to explore these relationships for youth. Because the Mighty Monarchs Adapted Sports Program will recruit and engage a large number of youth with disabilities over an extended period of time, the opportunity to conduct much needed research in this arena will be pursued. Grant funds will support ten sports wheelchairs for the program. This project is expected to impact 60 youth, ages 5-18 years old, with paralysis-causing conditions and their families. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 100 percent of the total project cost).

Oregon Paralyzed Veterans of America
Salem, OR
$2,895 – Adaptive Sports
This Quality of Life grant will support the purchase of a GRIT Freedom Chair that will be loaned to individuals with mobility challenges that reside in Oregon or are visiting the area, enabling them to join their families or others in outdoor events throughout the Northwest. These wheelchairs use gearing and upright poles to get propulsion for the chair. They work off road, on hiking trails and even on the beach. The GRIT Freedom Chair was designed by a world-class team of MIT engineers to handle any terrain. The 26“ mountain bike tires provide superior traction, especially compared to regular wheelchair wheels, and coupled with the lever drive, it's an unstoppable combination. The GRIT Freedom Chair's lightweight steel frame is extremely strong and provides a smooth ride over bumpy terrain. The big front wheel doesn't get stuck and the three-wheeled footprint is stable like a tripod. This grant will support the purchase of one GRIT Freedom Chair, and the manufacturer will cover the cost of a second one, enabling more individuals to be impacted by the project. It is expected that this project will impact 100 individuals, ages 13 years and above, that have conditions such as spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, and ALS. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 74 percent of the total project cost).

Paralyzed Veterans of America North Central Chapter
Sioux Falls, SD
$5,000 – Adaptive Sports
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the 15th Annual PVA North Central Chapter/Firefighters Walleye Fishing Event, in which Firefighters from around the state of South Dakota provide their personal boats and the manpower to take veterans with spinal cord dysfunctions fishing for 2 days in Chamberlain, South Dakota on the Missouri River. Each boat has a Firefighter and Co-Captain, along with 1 to 2 angler(s), most of whom use wheelchairs. PVA North Central Chapter provides all financial support for the volunteers and veterans, other than a dinner provided by the Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) Post 628. For many of the paralyzed or disabled anglers, this is their only opportunity each year to fish from a boat. Safely transferring someone who has limited or no lower limb mobility into a boat is a monumental undertaking very few would consider attempting without the resources this group brings to this event. An electric wheelchair alone averages 400 - 500 pounds. The Firefighters have mastered this task by manufacturing a support beam which slides onto the prongs of a boom forklift. A custom harness is attached to the support beam, which is used to raise both a wheelchair and the angler in it, from the parking lot into a boat. The event will be held will be held May 25-26, 2017, and it is expected that 75 individuals over the age of 19 years old with paralysis-causing conditions will be impacted. Grant funds will support accessible lodging for the participants. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 33 percent of the total project cost).

Paraquad, Inc.
Saint Louis, MO
$4,700 – Fitness and Wellness
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the acquisition of a Lite Gait 400ES for Paraquad's Accessible Health and Wellness Center. The Lite Gait 400ES features a powered lift that can quickly bring a patient up to 6'8" tall and 400 pounds from sitting in a wheelchair to a full standing position over a treadmill or the ground. The Lite Gait 400ES provides postural stability and bio-mechanically appropriate posture. Originally opened in 2004 in partnership with Washington University, the Center is an accessible exercise facility for people with disabilities. Paraquad's staff of physical and occupational therapists work with each participant to design an individualized fitness plan to maximize his or her health and functional independence goals. The staff also supports people discharged from rehabilitation facilities to continue therapeutic exercise programs. Over the past decade, Washington University's researchers have tracked program data during an introductory 12-week period, which shows participants consistently experience improved strength and endurance and reduced secondary health conditions. The Lite Gait 400ES will be the latest piece of equipment offered by the Accessible Health and Wellness Center, adding to the an array of wheelchair-accessible exercise equipment, including arm ergometers for aerobic exercise; Vitaglide for upper body strength; and weight equipment. These machines help participants improve functions such as strength, endurance, circulation, range of motion, and bone density. Additionally, the Center offers a unique mobility skills course where people with recently acquired disabilities learn to navigate everyday obstacles such as slopes, ramps, uneven pavement, and stairs. It is expected that this project will impact 180 individuals ages 19 years old and up that have stroke, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophy, polio and other paralysis-causing conditions. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 3 percent of the total project cost).

Pennsylvania Elks Major Projects, Inc.
Somerset, PA
$5,000 – Caregiving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support a program to provide children and adults with disabilities the support services and resources they need to live as independently as possible and maintain a healthier lifestyle. They will receive needed support and advocacy services to promote full participation in community life. Family members and others who care for them will receive the support they need to decrease their stress and improve their quality of life. Children and adults with disabilities will receive access to affordable, quality health care, including dental care and oral hygiene. In addition, the need for behavioral health care services will be evaluated and services will be accessed as needed. Durable medical equipment and supplies will be obtained. Assistive technology will be accessed to foster independence and improve health and safety. Children born with disabilities or who acquired them later will receive the early intervention services they need to foster healthy development. Youth with special needs will receive the support they need to transition successfully to adulthood. Adults will receive the home- and community-based services they need to be able to live as independently as possible. Grant funds will support home visit travel costs. It is expected that this program will impact 3,500 individuals with paralysis and their families, providing a continuum of care through every stage of life. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds .6 percent of the total project cost).

Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine Foundation
Philadelphia, PA
$12,500 – Transition from Institution to Home
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the Virtual Life program, a partnership between Inglis Gardens at Belmont, Home Care Associates, Magee Medical Home, and Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM), which will test a new model of care enabling individuals with significant physical disabilities and complex health care needs to live well and independently in the community. Virtual Life is specifically designed to provide an array of support services, including housing, primary care, home attendants, and case management for individuals living with paralysis and related mobility impairments to successfully transition from a long-term care facility and support their integration into independent living. The dream of independent living will finally become a reality for 24 individuals as a result of this innovative and collaborative project. As the project proves to be successful, these comprehensive services will be offered to community members with profound disabilities. This grant will help to support the accessible primary health care, and specifically will support one electronic wheelchair scale with handrails, one Hoyer lift, and one electric adjustable examination table. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 16 percent of the total project cost).

Pittsburgh Penguins Foundation
Pittsburgh, PA
$5,400 – Adaptive Sports
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the expansion of Mighty Penguins Sled Hockey to additional players with disabilities in the Pittsburgh region. Adding a third team will not only allow more youth to have ice time, but will serve as an intermediate level for many players who are in between skill levels. Grant funds will be used to purchase the extra equipment needed for these additional players to keep everyone compliant and safe on the ice; specifically, 8 sled hockey sleds and 8 sets of hockey sticks. This project is expected to impact 60 individuals ages 5-60 years old with paralysis-causing conditions and their families. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 18 percent of the total project cost).

PROVAIL
Seattle, WA
$12,600 – Physical/Occupational Therapy
PROVAIL is the only organization in the region offering a full range of comprehensive services so that people with disabilities can live, work, and fully participate in the community according to their choices. In order to serve more children with complex needs, the PROVAIL headquarters planned a comprehensive renovation and expansion, including the Clinic Therapy Room. Grant funds will help fund the purchase and installation of an overhead lift system and hygiene support station for the new therapy room bathroom, ensuring that the upgraded facility will be able to meet the needs of all clients safely and with dignity and respect. It is expected that 655 individuals of all ages with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 7 percent of the total project cost).

Providence Little Company of Mary
San Pedro, CA
$10,850 – Durable Medical Equipment
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the Providence Rehabcentre Wheelchair Clinic, which works to build confidence in clients that will need to use wheelchairs for mobility. Clients have the opportunity to trial ultralight wheelchairs, discuss options with therapists and specialists, see visuals from the pressure mapping device to make decisions on cushions and comfort, and speak to other clients who can give them first-hand experience. The Providence Rehabcentre Wheelchair Clinic will help to provide mobility options for clients to once again participate in the community, with simple tasks or highly interactive adaptive sports. The Wheelchair Clinic can provide a critical starting point to independent living by expanding access to mobility equipment and pressure mapping. Adding a pressure mapping system and trial ultralights with cushion support will allow the caregiving team and the client to identify the mobility device for overall health and comfort. Grant funds will support a pressure mapping system with accessories, a Catalyst 5Vx ultralight folding wheelchair package, and a Tsunami ALX ultralight rigid frame wheelchair package. It is expected that this project will impact 250 individuals ages 19 years and above that have paralysis-causing conditions such as spinal cord injury, Parkinson's, multiple sclerosis, Guillain-Barré Syndrome, spinal muscular atrophy, and transverse myelitis. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 3 percent of the total project cost).

R4 Alliance
Sun Valley, ID
$13,000 – Adaptive Sports
This Quality of Life grant will support Operation Access Outdoors (ACCESS), which will allow veterans and civilians in the disability community to access to therapeutic recreational programs as part of their healing plan. R4 is partnered with Outrider USA, a manufacturer of adaptive, all-terrain bikes that allow individuals that have paralysis and other mobility challenges and their families to participate in outdoor recreational activities and improve their quality of life. Outrider vehicles have a wide array adaptive features, providing a versatile platform for riders with spinal cord injuries. The Horizon model offers optimal usability for individuals with spinal cord injury. Settings are adjustable to meet the unique needs of each rider. Grant funds will support the purchase of one Horizon Outrider all-terrain bike that will be loaned to veterans free of charge, and will be used by select nonprofit organizations that provide safe outdoor activities for disabled veterans and their family members programs for off-road rides, cross country rides, racing events, trail adventures and more. It is expected that 250 veterans and civilians with paralysis-causing conditions and their families will be impacted by this project. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 17 percent of the total project cost).

Rancho Research Institute
Downy, CA
$15,675 – Arts Program
This Quality of Life grant will support Photography as Therapy for Individuals With Spinal Cord Injury, a program that enables individuals with spinal cord injury to learn photography as a means of creative expression and a way to channel negative emotion into something positive. Photography is an ideal tool to engage and inspire people who are struggling with their lives. Photography combines instant, tangible gratification with the potential to rework an image to perfection—and then share it with friends or strangers to get feedback and provoke reaction. Each student produces photographs to be exhibited and presented in an online portfolio. The great value of this process was first demonstrated in 2014 by the documented success of the first two-semester Photography as Therapy program. Each student was given a camera and then asked to show the world through their eyes. Under the tutelage of a professional photographer, the results were astonishing. The images were thought provoking, heart wrenching, and above all, thoroughly unique in their perspective. The 19 graduates of this startup program reported that they were more confident and independent and that the program helped them to look beyond their own disability. This grant will support the costs for the photography instructor, guest speakers, and project coordinator in order to continue these classes for a year. This project will impact 18 individuals, ages 19-60 years old, that have paralysis caused by spinal cord injury. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 64 percent of the total project cost).

ReinventAbility
Chicago, IL
$2,155 – Arts Program
This Quality of Life grant will support Dancing with Disability, a program of weekly dance classes offered to teenagers that reside at Illinois Center for Rehabilitation and Education (ICRE), a state of Illinois school charged with preparing “students age 16-21 with severe physical disabilities for independent living. The program uses dance to teach skills needed for independent living, such as community mobility and advocacy skills. Inclusion is promoted by teaching social dancing strategies as well as specific dances that students may encounter out in the community, such as popular line dances that are often engaged in at school dances or weddings. Grant funds will support the assistant dance instructor (a dancer that has spina bifida), a dance instructor apprentice, music and music licensing. It is expected that this project will impact 150 individuals ages 13 – 24, that have conditions such as spina bifida, cerebral palsy, spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, and polio. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 46 percent of the total project cost).

Rockford Park District Foundation
Rockford, IL
$2,500 – Adaptive Sports
This Quality of Life grant will help to support a floating water wheelchair for the Magic Waters Water Park, a family-friendly community park with high standards for safety, cleanliness, and friendly customer service. In 2011 Magic Waters was awarded an Aquatics International award and rated the #4 publicly-owned water park in the country. Guests with disabilities enjoy the park assisted by accommodations as needed. Accessible rides and attractions within the park include: Tsunami Bay - the largest wave pool in Illinois featuring a zero-depth entrance and a wave pool that alternates between calm water and wild waves; Splash Magic River—an attraction that features a zero-depth entrance and allows participants to float along the "river" and relax; Tiki Island—an attraction that offers a variety of sensory fun for all ages and interactive water toys, topped off by a 1,000 gallon water bucket that tips and sends water splashing everywhere. The water wheelchair will enable people living with disabilities, who may have otherwise had to watch from outside each attraction, to experience the waterpark attractions with their families. It is expected that 50 individuals with paralysis, ages 5 – 60 years old, will be impacted by this project. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 100 percent of the total project cost).

Rocklin Swim Team
Rocklin, CA
$4,000 – Adaptive Sports
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the Adaptive Aquatics Youth Summer Program, an opportunity for youth with special needs to experience aquatic activities and develop water awareness. The program is designed so that swim instructors will work one-on-one with special needs youth. Due to the sensitive needs of the participants, a professional in the field of special needs therapy is present to oversee the sessions. The sessions are grouped with 3-6 participants so that each child receives the level of assistance that best suits their needs. Sessions are designed by a professional swim instructor and physical therapist to allow each child the opportunity to advance at their own pace, yet be challenging enough to allow the child to feel accomplished. Water safety is enforced and depending on the skill level of each child, early-to-beginning swim techniques are taught in a fun and positive environment. The program is free to children and youth between the ages of 1 and 18 years old. Registration is done on a first-come-first-served basis with priority registration given to children referred to the program by local service providers. Aside from the physical benefit of being in the water and having the ability to move freely without their disability acting as a barrier, the program is designed to develop a sense of community. Families have opportunities to meet other families that are involved in the swim team, which includes a network of families dedicated to youth in the community. Grant funds will support the swim instructor, life guard, and physical therapist. It is expected that this project will impact 8 youth, from infant to 18 years old, that have cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophy, dyspraxia, and any other paralysis-causing conditions. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 40 percent of the total project cost).

S - T

Sanctuary Hill Foundation NFP
Petersburg, IL
$9,300 – Therapeutic Horseback Riding
Sanctuary Hill Foundation NFP was originally founded in 2006 to help children in need. In 2014, the organization embraced a concept for delivering innovative programs for children and adults with physical and developmental disabilities through interactions with horses, and the Bright Star Equestrian Centre was born. Located in Petersburg, Illinois, a small rural area in central Illinois, Bright Star Equestrian Centre serves riders that reside mostly in Menard, Sangamon and Mason counties, where it is the only therapeutic riding facility that is certified as a Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship (PATH) center. Expanded programming in 2016 includes family support services called the Bright Star Family Circle, and Veritas, an equine therapy program specifically created for combat veterans. Grant funds will support the installation of a portable mounting ramp and mechanized lift for children and adults who have severe mobility losses and are not able to access the mounting block or lift themselves onto the saddle to ride the horse because they lack motor control, or are too heavy to be lifted onto the saddle by volunteers. It is expected that 38 individuals with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 45 percent of the total project cost).

SCI Recovery Project
Denver, CO
$5,500 – Fitness and Wellness
The SCI Recovery Project strives to optimize the level of physical and emotional wellness for those impacted by spinal cord injury through progressive, evidence-based adaptive exercise techniques, alternative health and wellness programs and the cultivation of creative community partnerships. Initially traveling by truck with minimal equipment to serve participants with spinal cord injury in their homes, the organization now occupies a 5,600 square foot state-of-the-art adaptive exercise facility in north Denver. Programs are available to all individuals with spinal cord injury regardless of their physical challenges, and include Adaptive Exercise, Open Gym and Integrative Therapies. Fees for the Adaptive Exercise and Open Gym Programs are subsidized through fundraising efforts to keep costs low for all clients. Skilled Adaptive Exercise Specialists and Integrative Therapy Providers help individuals identify their goals for health, wellness, and recovery, and those goals drive the services provided. Recognizing that the term “recovery“ is subjective and individual outcomes are unpredictable, clients are assisted in pursuing their individual goals--whether they are as simple as being able to scratch their nose, or as complex as learning to stand and take steps again. Success is identified not only in physical improvements, but also in the maintenance of health and wellness, with the focus is on the whole person, not the physical limitations they face as result of their injury. Grant funds will help to support a Neurogym Sit-to-Stand Trainer. It is expected that 250 individuals with paralysis, ages 18 and above, and their families will be impacted by this project. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 8 percent of the total project cost).

Shakopee Diversity Alliance
Shakopee, MN
$13,245 – Accessible Playground/Ballfield
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the Shakopee Fun for All Playground, an accessible play center at Lions Park, the City of Shakopee's oldest park. Lions Park is open to the public year round, and is home to SandVenture Aquatic Park and the City's 18-hole Disc Golf Course. This park is a favorite for company picnics, family reunions and community events. The 50-acre park has a basketball court, playground, tennis courts, hockey rink, trails and pleasure skating area. It also provides public restrooms and picnic shelters and a warming house. Grant funds will support the installation of a Sway Fun® Glider,“ an essential piece of equipment that is the first wheelchair accessible glider that is ADA compliant and meets all safety standards. Twin bench seating accommodates room for friends and family, along with three bench and two wheelchair handholds, and an interactive play table with dual cup holders. The Sway Fun® glider is for people of all abilities to enjoy outdoor play for many years. It is expected that this project will impact 5,000 individuals of all ages and ability levels. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 3 percent of the total project cost).

Shane's Inspiration
Sherman Oaks, CA
$2,500 – Accessible Playground/Ballfield
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Together, We Are Able, a program that transforms inclusive playgrounds into classrooms where compassion and acceptance are the core learning objectives. Delivered free of charge to grades K-12 in Los Angeles, the program reinforces critical social skills for children with disabilities while promoting respect for diversity, understanding and awareness in their typically developing peers and teachers. The program is delivered in the following steps: DAY 1: In-Class Workshop: DAY 2: Interactive Field Trip: Students then pair with their peers with disabilities for a day of play at a Shane's Inspiration inclusive playground. In addition to scheduling the field trip, Shane's Inspiration pays for bus transportation from the campus to the playground via local transportation companies. This aspect can be cost prohibitive for schools with students using wheelchairs and require multiple buses. Without this support, more severely impacted students would not be able to participate. Once at the Shane's Inspiration playground, students with typical abilities are paired up with children with disabilities for a day of play, allowing students to gain insight and connect socially through first-hand experience. Shane's Inspiration staff facilitate the interaction, showing the students how to communicate, connect and play beyond their differences. Each field trip lasts approximately 3 hours. Day 3:Follow-Up Presentation: A second forty-five minute classroom workshop follows the field trip. It begins with a post-field trip written exercise, which allows educators to measure the shift in beliefs and attitudes about disabilities. This is followed by a wrap-up discussion that gives students the opportunity to share successes, challenges and reaffirms what they learned personally through the experience. A closing activity illustrates the reciprocity of their experience on the playground, emphasizing the gifts both sets of students gave to one another. To further extend the program's long-term impact, a professional development program was created, which trains educators to self-deliver the program, increasing the number of children impacted an on-going basis. Educators have the opportunity to download the programming materials free of charge and, through staff guidance, implement the program in their classrooms and schools. Grant funds will support accessible bus transportation. It is expected that 105 children with paralysis-causing conditions, ages 0-12 years old, will be impacted by this project. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 1 percent of the total project cost).

Shelby Residential and Vocational Services, Inc. (SRVS)
Memphis, TN
$5,950 – Therapeutic Horseback Riding
Shelby Residential and Vocational Services, Inc. (SRVS) is West Tennessee's largest provider of disability services, supporting more than 1,000 individuals in the Memphis region. Services are designed to follow the arc of clients' lives—from birth to end of life—and to meet a full spectrum of the families' needs, regardless of the severity of the disability. SRVS programs include: Community Living, Learning Centers, SRVS Kids & Families, Community Employment Services, Family Support, Intermediate Care Facilities, Personal Assistance, and Elderly and Adult Disability Services. These supports improve the quality of life of individuals with disabilities while increasing their independence and self-sufficiency. Their families and caregivers, in turn, have more freedom to work and participate in the community. In 2015, SRVS partnered with Southern Reins, a local equine therapy provider; to offer access to the benefits of equine therapy. Participants experienced the satisfaction of learning a new skill, strengthened their bodies, and interacted with Southern Reins staff and volunteers, even making new friends. However, it was evident that the majority of SRVS clients were missing out on this opportunity because they live on extremely fixed incomes and cannot afford to participate in activities that many people take for granted. The lack of accessible transportation is also a barrier to accessing services. This project will expand access to the therapies at Southern Reins to clients with paralysis by enabling SRVS to subsidize the cost of sessions for clients. SRVS will fund ninety percent of the cost of 20 weeks of lessons and clients will pay the remaining ten percent. This project will provide 12-15 adults with paralysis or limited mobility (many who have cerebral palsy, use a wheelchair, and have limited financial resources) with subsidized therapeutic riding sessions and hippotherapy sessions. Beyond the physical benefits, the programming at Southern Reins allows these individuals to socialize with typical and non-typical peers, connect to their community, and perhaps most importantly, experience the joy and pride that comes with learning new skills. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 82 percent of the total project cost).

Shepherd Center
Atlanta, GA
$3,339 – Adaptive Sports
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the Shepherd Center's adaptive sports program, which helps to empower patients and all in the community with disabilities to lead active, happy, and healthy lifestyles through team and individual competition. Shepherd Center athletes challenge stereotypes about individuals with disabilities by demonstrating that they can participate and thrive in sports at a competitive level. Sports teams also provide hope and motivation for the Shepherd Center inpatient population. Exposing patients to practice sessions and competition helps them to see that life beyond injury or illness can be full of fun, vigorous, and challenging physical activity. Adaptive sports results in a greater level of reintegration as an active and productive community member. Increased self-esteem, self-confidence and self-efficacy often lead to increased likelihood of employment, with enhanced productivity and less absenteeism. Individuals increase their knowledge that will allow them to seek ways of incorporating new ways of life that make them not only independent but happy daily with their overall quality of life. Many times, this not only helps the patient with the disability but their family and friends that are there to support them. Grant funds will support one Catrike 5.5.9. Grand Touring Bike, a high-performance bike designed for long-distance rides with extraordinary comfort. This equipment will be used for community members, inpatient, day program and outpatient patients. The bike can be adjusted to better fit different body types. It is expected that 100 individuals with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds .2 percent of the total project cost).

Sociedad, Educación y Rehabilitación (SER) de Puerto Rico, Inc.
San Juan, PR
$5,243 – Physical/Occupational Therapy
This Quality of Life grant will help to support SER de Puerto Rico's Aquatic Therapy Center. SER inaugurated in 2015 a world-class Technological Pediatric Therapeutic Center in its San Juan, Puerto Rico facilities. It is the only of its kind in Puerto Rico. Aligned to its mission and abiding to its course towards offering better services to its participants, SER will renovate its Aquatic Therapy Center in 2017. This will provide an updated therapeutic opportunity that would otherwise not be available for the target population—the majority of participants being children, youth and young adults with a disability. Currently SER provides services to 4,600 participants, and there is a waiting list for other persons with a disability that require the services provided at the institution. SER's Aquatic Therapy Center Renovation will be funded by Banco Popular de Puerto Rico ($48,000). Grant funds will support the installation of a hydraulic lift, which will provide access to participants while preventing harm to them and personnel providing assistance. This lift will replace the existing hydraulic lift, which has been used for over 22 years and is no longer safely operational, and aquatic physical therapy tools. It is expected that 300 individuals with paralysis-causing conditions such as cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, spina bifida, spinal cord injury, stroke, spinal muscular atrophy and brain injury will be impacted by this project. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 10 percent of the total project cost).

Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital Corporation
Boston, MA
$6,760 – Adaptive Sports
This Quality of Life grant will help to support a first-of-its-kind collaboration with Massachusetts Department of Recreation and Conservation's Universal Access Program (MADCR UAP) to open an operations center in a State Park (Nickerson State Park on Cape Cod, MA) to provide adaptive land and water sport opportunities to local community members, tourists visiting Cape Cod and to the inpatient population from the hospital in Sandwich, MA. This exciting collaboration has necessitated the expansion of the fleet of adapted recreational equipment for use by individuals with spinal cord injury. This equipment would also be available to travel throughout the service network to be used by spinal cord injured clients at special events from Cape Cod, MA to Cape Ann, MA on the northeastern shore of Massachusetts. Spaulding is committed to maintaining the highest standards of care, and these high standards extend into community-linked adaptive sports activities. This facilitates the connection between individuals with spinal cord injury and the community-at-large, reducing isolation and promoting healthy lifestyle options. Grant funds will support one Top End CrossFire Wheelchair and one GRIT Freedom Chair all-terrain wheelchair. It is expected that this project will impact 100 individuals ranging in age from 5 – 90+ years old, the majority of whom have spinal cord injury, as well as other conditions including stroke, trauma with nerve injury, poliomyelitis, cerebral palsy, peripheral neuropathy, Parkinson's disease, ALS, botulism, spina bifida, multiple sclerosis, and Guillain-Barré syndrome. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 2 percent of the total project cost).

Spina Bifida Texas
San Antonio, TX
$5,500 – Peer Mentoring and Support
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the establishment of the SB Buddies Mentoring Program, the first of its kind in Central and South Texas. Program guidance will be provided by Big Brothers Big Sisters of South Texas (BBBS), which has facilitated thousands of empowering relationships since 1976. Through this well-researched service delivery process, SBTX will pair the SB Buddies based on shared interests, hobbies, and preferences. Every month SBTX will host a SB Buddies event, and will offer activities including bowling, wheelchair sports, movies, outings to the mall, and afternoon socials. Throughout the mentoring relationship, SBTX will employ the professional case management of BBBS to support to the youth, families, and volunteers through this process. This ongoing supervision and communication ensures child safety and positive experiences as part of the commitment to creating a positive life. SB Buddies will provide the children with a cherished bond and positive role model that can help them to visualize a successful future that includes gainful employment and meaningful relationships. It will demonstrate that they are not suffering with spina bifida and spina bifida isn't a tragedy. By the end of the first year, participants will see what they are capable of in spite of having a physical limitation. Grant funds will support the program director (responsible for recruitment of volunteers and participants, project planning and coordination, group activities and evaluating and reporting outcomes); volunteer screening, volunteer training, and staff training; board games, sports equipment and programmatic printing costs; wheelchair accessible van rental for monthly SB Buddy Outings for 1 year; mileage reimbursements, and background checks for volunteers. It is expected that 60 youth with spina bifida and their families will be impacted by this project. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 45 percent of the total project cost).

Saint Francis Home
Tiffin, OH
$9,675 – Durable Medical Equipment
St. Francis Home is a nonprofit organization comprised of 20 assisted living units, 22 Chiara Center units (specializing in care for individuals with Alzheimer's Disease) and 132 units for skilled and long-term care residents, all of which are private rooms. Each resident is respected as a unique individual with his/her own life history, talents, interests, and abilities. Residents are given personal attention and encouraged to function at their highest level of independence to help them maintain dignity, self-worth, and autonomy. Since 1869 and during the time period that no government or insurance programs were available to pay for nursing home care, St. Francis Home has provided care for those in need, regardless of their ability to pay for their care. At St. Francis Home no one is ever turned away because of their inability to pay. Currently, 57% of residents are on the Medicaid program. This Quality of Life grant will help to support the purchase and installation of 5 electric hospital beds with independent hand controls that will enable patients with limited mobility to adjust their beds independently, so they do not have to be totally dependent on other people to make even a simple adjustment so they can watch TV or read a book or even just sleep a little more comfortably. This project will replace manual crank-handle adjustable beds that require nurses or the family members of patients to crawl under or stoop very low to reach a hand crank under the bed, which then has to be turned many times to get the feet to raise; and if the desire is to raise the head end of the bed, a second lever must be turned. This project will impact at least 5 individuals, ages 46 years old and above, that have paralysis caused by either multiple sclerosis or stroke. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 7 percent of the total project cost).

St. Mary's Healthcare System for Children
Bayside, NY
$5,072 - Physical/Occupational Therapy
St. Mary's Healthcare System for Children is one of only a handful of organizations around the country that is dedicated to providing intensive rehabilitation, specialized care, and education to children with medical complexity and life-limiting conditions. Established in 1870, St. Mary's is New York City's first children's hospital. Located in Bayside Queens, the 97-bed inpatient facility is designed for children with the highest degree of medical complexity. This facility also provides medical day care to children and young adults, medical early education, a multidisciplinary Feeding Disorders Program, and a K-12 public school that educates long-term inpatients who may be admitted for several months, or even years. Additionally, Home Care Programs reach nearly 2,000 medically fragile children each day throughout greater New York City and Long Island, making St. Mary's one of the largest providers of long-term home healthcare for children in New York State. St. Mary's Aquatic Therapy program has become one of the hospital's most popular programs, and ensures that children—who may reside at St. Mary's for months, or even years—have access to fun, restorative, and engaging programming. Since being established in October 2013, the program has grown dramatically, increasing from 160 minutes of therapy sessions per month to 1,800 minutes per month. In 2015, St. Mary's conducted over 500 aquatic therapy sessions. Using the relieving, low-impact environment of water to help young patients achieve their health and rehabilitation goals, aquatic therapy has proven to benefit children with musculoskeletal and neurological conditions as well as children recovering from major surgeries or traumatic injuries. Currently, a standardized aquatic therapy certification does not exist for physical and occupational therapists, and this poses a challenge when hiring new therapists to work with children with medically complex conditions. In order to meet the ambitious goal of a 60% increase in aquatic therapy minutes per month (approximately 300 additional sessions annually), this project will work with a leading special needs aquatics provider to create customized formalized training for current St. Mary's physical and occupational therapists, as well as one that can be utilized to orient new staff with limited aquatics experience. Grant funds will support training for 5 physical and occupational therapists, and 8 hours of instruction provided by the special needs aquatics provider. This project expects to impact at least 100 individuals, from infancy to young adulthood, that live with paralysis caused by spinal cord injuries, cerebral palsy, and traumatic brain injuries, infection, tumor, or stroke. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 31 percent of the total project cost).

Tennessee Technological University
Cookeville, TN
$6,931 – Caregiving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Simulation to Teach Safe Patient Handling for Home Caregivers, which consists of the development and implementation of a training workshop for caregivers using the Safe Patient Handling and Mobility: Interprofessional National Standards for safe patient handling (ANA, 2013). An interdisciplinary training involving the use of assistive devices in a simulated learning environment will be presented by a physical therapist and a nurse with specialty certification in simulation education. The training will be presented at no cost to groups of 10-12 participants, and registration priority will be given to caregivers and families of patients with paralysis. Participants for the training will be recruited from the Upper Cumberland region made up of 14 counties in middle TN. Twelve of these counties are designated as whole-county medically underserved areas (MUAs) while the remaining two counties are designated partial-county MUAs (Tennessee Dept. of Health, 2016). The training will be presented in the Whitson-Hester School of Nursing Simulation Laboratory at Tennessee Tech University with the use of both mannequins and assistive devices. The School of Nursing has a battery operated sit-to-stand lift that can be used. Grant funds will support a full body lift for use in the training, as this is the type of lift device that will typically be used in the home. Objectives that will be evaluated include: increased knowledge, competence, and confidence of caregivers following active learning in the use of assistive devices; integration of knowledge into the care of people with paralysis and others served by this group of caregivers, and improved safety during transfer and mobility for caregivers and those they serve. This project is expected to impact 300 individuals with paralysis-causing conditions, ages 19-60 years old and their families. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 100 percent of the total project cost).

The Ability Center of Greater Toledo
Toledo, OH
$2,500 – Service Animal Program
Since 1990, The Ability Center of Greater Toledo has been a Center for Independent Living, providing advocacy, peer support, information & referral, independent living skills training, and support for community living in seven northwest Ohio counties. Assistance Dogs for Achieving Independence (ADAI), a program of The Ability Center, helps children and adults with disabilities to achieve greater independence by training and placing service and therapy dogs to assist with an individual's daily needs. ADAI serves persons in Michigan, Ohio and Indiana, and provides service and therapy dogs to eligible individuals living within a 250-mile radius of Sylvania, Ohio. This includes most of Ohio, northeastern Indiana and southern Michigan. The services provided in these geographic areas are unduplicated. Currently there are 21 individuals with paralysis (i.e. cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, neurological disorders, muscular dystrophy, and other conditions that cause paralysis) on the ADAI-approved waiting list. These individuals typically wait 18-24 months to receive their canine companion. The intense level of training, veterinary care, outreach/follow up activities, equipment and supplies required currently costs approximately $26,000 for each dog placed. Thankfully, through a strong volunteer network that includes fundraisers, trainers and fosters, and the prison puppy training program, the cost to clients is nominal. No one is ever denied a service or therapy dog based on his or her ability to pay the application and equipment fee. Grant funds will support the acquisition of two young therapy dogs and specially designed halters, leashes, crates, and dog beds. Two individuals with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 5 percent of the total project cost).

The ALS Association - DC/MD/VA Chapter
Rockville, MD
$7,300 – Assistive Technology
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the expansion of the Assistive Technology program, which enhances the quality of life for those living with ALS and their families by teaching them how to use special technology to perform everyday tasks, such as environmental controls to help answer the telephone or operate light switches as a person's muscles weaken, and augmentative communication devices such as computers with communication software and eye-tracking technology. To enhance the effectiveness of care and provide more people with greater access to services, two new models for delivering care will be established: Assistive Technology (AT) Clinics to serve people with ALS in Rockville, Maryland, and Richmond, Virginia; and a Mobile ALS Clinic to serve people with ALS in Virginia Beach, Virginia. Each setting would have an AT Treatment Kit, which consists of eye gaze or eye tracking technology, head tracking devices, and communication devices/software and applications, as well as voice banking, switches, and communication boards. The AT Clinic is an innovative model for serving people and families, and will increase the availability of AT services to those who are able to travel to the clinic location because several people rather than a single person can be served at once. More people can be educated about ALS and trained on how to use AT equipment, and equipment can be loaned to those who lack insurance coverage or the ability to fund AT devices. People with ALS will be provided with opportunities to leave their homes and meet with other people and care providers. An AT clinic in the community improves access to care for more than people with ALS. The clinic and the technology available there can serve as a community resource for training speech and occupational therapists. Once trained, these professional caregivers can use their newfound expertise and the AT kits to serve not only ALS patients but any of the patients they treat who are struggling with communication disorders and muscle control. This includes stroke patients, people with brain or spinal cord injury, primary lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, and cerebral palsy. To strengthen this chapter's ability to reach even more people with ALS and, at the same time, elevate public awareness about this silent disease, a mobile ALS clinic will be offered. This mobile clinic will consist of a standard cargo van that has been retrofitted with the computers, technology, and equipment needed to serve people with ALS outside the formal clinic environment. The van will allow AT specialists and volunteers to easily transport equipment to a clinic, corporate environment, or home setting. While two new AT clinics will serve people in the Rockville and Richmond territories, the van offers the ability to extend the program's reach to areas where access to services is severely limited, including remote counties in Southwest Virginia. Grant funds will support 8 patient communication device kits. It is expected that this project will impact 450 individuals with ALS, ages of 25 years and over and their families. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 3 percent of the total project cost).

The Botanic Garden at Historic Barns Park

Traverse City, MI
$5,000 – Facility Accessibility Modifications
This Quality of Life grant will support an initiative to improve accessibility between the lower and upper levels of the Botanic Garden. Specifically, this project will create a switchback ramp and railing to enable children, youth and adults living with mobility limitations to move readily and independently between the lower level of the gardens and visitor center to the pavilion and classroom on the upper level. The design work for the switchback ramp has been funded and completed and is integrated into the overall master plan for the garden. The design complies with all requirements of the ADA and has been reviewed by a local construction firm familiar with the site. The Botanic Garden at Historic Barns Park is Northwest Michigan's only public garden, located in Traverse City, the commercial, health care and cultural center for the region, and is adjacent to Munson Medical Center, the flagship of 11 hospitals and medical centers serving the Northern Michigan region, along with The Pavilions, an extended care and rehabilitation center. The Center is the only Level II trauma center for all of Northern Michigan, is designated as a Primary Stroke Center by the Joint Commission and the American Heart Association, and offers a comprehensive array of rehabilitation therapies. The close proximity of the medical center to the Botanic Garden, and the paved trail that links them, present a tremendous opportunity for respite for patients, families and caregivers from throughout the region and a chance to enjoy a public garden designed with them in mind. This project helps to ensure that persons who use assistive devices for mobility can access the array of spaces, activities and events within the garden and do so with the greatest possible independence. It is expected that this project will impact 1,500 individuals of all ages and paralysis-causing conditions and their families. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 12 percent of the total project cost).

The Lazarus House
Houston, TX
$4,709 – Fitness and Wellness
The Lazarus House is a center for wellness, dedicated to decreasing and limiting the effects of muscle wasting in those living with chronic illness or injury through wellness, nutrition, and support in a non-clinical, safe environment. It provides program of opportunity and hope to people managing chronic situations like spinal cord injury/disease, cancer, stroke, MS, and HIV. Operating from the comfort of a renovated Victorian house, Lazarus House has created a low or no cost program of hope through condition-specific exercises, nutritional guidance, and peer support. Since its inception, Lazarus House has served more people each year than the prior, bringing the current client base to 53 people served a day, which is the limit of capacity due to space limitations and because of that limitation, a waiting list has grown to over 20 names. The largest request for service comes from the spinal cord injury/disease and stroke population. As their health insurance is exhausted, many state that they are seeking safe places of service that can provide wellness opportunities until the insurance is available again. Lazarus House fills that gap. The current facility is being expanded to allow for doubling clients served, as well as to improve accessibility and provide state-of-the-art fitness equipment. It will be the first facility in Houston utilizing a completely accessible fitness equipment line, empowering clients with independence and opportunity. Grant funds will support one Bradley Advocate AV30 Lavatory station with 3-in-1 Sink (funds for two more of these lavatory units have already been committed by other sources) and one Elkay BiLevel Filtered Water Cooler with Bottle Filling Station. This conservation-designed lavatory equipment will provide maximum personal hygiene independence for individuals with paralysis. It is expected that at least 25 individuals with paralysis will be impacted by this project. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 42 percent of the total project cost).

Triumph Foundation

Santa Clarita, CA
$2,500 – Fitness and Wellness
Triumph Foundation, a chapter of United Spinal Association and a Paralympic Sport Club, provides mentorship, resources, hope and security to people living with paralysis–not just initially when the injury or disorder occurs—but as a lifelong support network. Additionally, the organization holds events that are a captivating force within the entire community of individuals with disability. This Quality of Life grant will support the Annual Wheelchair Sports Festival, which provides opportunities to individuals with spinal cord injury and their families to participate in adaptive sports activities, increase self-efficacy, prevent sedentary lifestyles, and enhance quality of life through the benefits of exercise, sport, and fitness. Held each spring during the last week of April at the Santa Clarita Sports Complex, the event is free to the public and open to people of all abilities. The Wheelchair Sports Festival has become a much-anticipated event for the spinal cord injury community. Beginning in 2012, Triumph had 100 participants and the event was one day; in 2013, 250 participants; in 2014, the event expanded to two days and had 362 participants; in 2015 the two-day event had over 500 participants; and in 2016 it expanded to include four additional sports and had over 800 participants plus volunteers and spectators. The Festival features wheelchair basketball, hockey, quad rugby, racquetball, handcycling, WCMX, wheelchair rodeo, scuba, and Over-the-Line baseball. Instruction is given for each sport by an elite disabled athlete coach. Outside, a resource fair is held, featuring adapted products and community services, and vendor booths are set-up for businesses that serve the individuals with disabilities. In addition, other activities are held, including painting and art workshops. Grant funds will support the purchase of one sports wheelchair. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 14 percent of the total project cost).

U - Z

University of Maryland Medical System Foundation
Baltimore, MD
$7,124 – Adaptive Sports
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the wheelchair basketball program, which helps former and current patients transition to playing basketball in the Baltimore City Recreation and Parks Division's Metro League and even National Wheelchair Basketball Association (NWBA) teams. This is a formalized wheelchair basketball program, with an annual six-week clinic kicking off each May and continuing throughout the summer months. The wheelchair basketball program welcomes both male and female players age 15 and above. Players who own an adapted sports wheelchair can use their own, and those who do not own a chair can borrow one from the Rehabilitation and Orthopaedic Institute. There is no cost to participate and family members and friends are encouraged to join and play as well. Drills, skill building exercises, and scrimmages are held on the basketball courts located on the campus of the University of Maryland Rehabilitation & Orthopaedic Institute. This is a great way for people to stay active and have fun. It increases quality of life and gives the players confidence to do other things in life, like return to work or pursue other activities that they originally thought they could no longer do. Key benefits of participating in the Adaptive Sports Program include: improved physical strength, range of motion, flexibility, and endurance; improved emotional well-being; enhanced quality of life; social interactions with others who have parallel interests; new connections with people who face similar challenges; opportunities to engage in competitive activity; and access to adapted equipment at no cost. Grant funds will support the purchase of 2 basketball wheelchairs, three pairs of basketball wheelchair tires, and 25 pair of sports wheelchair tire tubes. This project is expected to impact at least 12 individuals, ages 13 years and above, that have paralysis caused by injury, stroke, or a chronic health condition such as multiple sclerosis. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 20 percent of the total project cost).

Vermont Arts Council
Montpelier, VT
$2,000 – Arts Program
In April 2017, Vermont Arts Council project partners will host the Vermont Accessibility Symposium: The Art of Inclusion [working title] at the historic Town Hall Theater in Middlebury, Vermont. This initiative is designed to educate staff and volunteers at art organizations in Vermont on promoting inclusive participation by people in the arts—beyond just getting them through the doors as members of the audience—as artists, staff members, volunteers, or teachers. The symposium will offer networking opportunities, a keynote speaker, and an array of workshop sessions on accessibility features, personal and professional experiences, area resources, and model programs/best practices to share. Presenters will represent a wide range of expertise, including artists with and without disabilities, user experts, disability service and advocacy organizations, and representatives from various funding organizations. Symposium organizers and speakers include the president of the Vermont Coalition for Disability Rights (who was also the former executive director of the Vermont CIL) and editor of The Independent, a statewide newspaper for seniors, individuals with disabilities, and family members; a multi-disciplinary artist and educator with a passion for social justice and community work whose art and other work is informed by experience with disability, gender fluidity, and queer identity; and a nationally recognized accessibility consultant for cultural institutions who has promoted equal access for people with disabilities to cultural experience for over four decades and in 2015 was awarded The Kennedy Center Leadership Exchange in Arts and Disability (LEAD®) Award for Excellence in Accessibility Leadership for her inspiring dedication to inclusive practices in the arts and mentoring of cultural arts administrator. After the Symposium, follow-up meetings and surveys will foster connections and partnerships initiated at the symposium, which will serve as a catalyst to encourage members of the arts community to appreciate the value of inclusive arts practices and policies for all. Grant funds will support accessible transportation for the event for the artists, presenters and attendees. It is expected that 24 individuals with paralysis will be impacted by the symposium, and that many more will be impacted as a result of the changes implemented by the arts organizations that attended the symposium. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 4 percent of the total project cost).

Vermont Center for Independent Living
Montpelier, VT
$18,000 - Home Accessibility Modifications
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the Home Access Program, which provides home access modifications to Vermont residents that have paralysis and other mobility challenges. There are currently 40 individuals on the waiting list for home modifications, including one who applied for assistance over two years ago. All individuals on the wait list must meet three criteria: have a permanent physical disability which affects their mobility; household income is lower than 80% of the HUD median income by county; and be in need of a ramp or bathroom modification (typically tub-to-shower conversion) in order to participate in their community and/or live more independently in their own home. Because of Vermont's rural nature, many of its residents live in medically underserved areas. This project will impact 6 individuals with paralysis who have identified a ramp as a goal to enable them (and their families) to leave their homes to participate in their communities, as well as enabling other people on the wait list to receive assistance sooner. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 33 percent of the total project cost).

Village of Hamburg Community Playground Committee
Hamburg, NY
$12,885 – Accessible Playground/Ballfield
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the Hamburg Community Playground, which replaces the existing outdated playground with a new playground that is more accessible, enabling many children who were unable to access the various play components of the previous playground to now have the ability to get onto the playground and play with other children. The new playground will have a wheelchair accessible walkway that allows for access into the playground from the main parking lot or from the side street, and to connect the accessible play pieces so that children of all abilities can interact and play together. Children will be attracted to the accessible play pieces so that individuals of all abilities will be interacting with one another and that no groups will be isolated from one another. The playground will be a destination for children of all levels of abilities and their families. There is a large day treatment program serving individuals with various levels of abilities located within one mile from this community center playground and 75 group homes in a five-mile radius of the site. There is also at least one group home serving individuals with various levels of abilities one block away from the playground, which would be accessible by wheelchair or a short walk. The Village of Hamburg has sidewalks throughout that all lead to this community center park. Grant funds will support the installation of a Sway Fun accessible glider, which is the most accessible piece of playground equipment for the widest range of individual abilities. The Sway Fun has direct ramp access that allows a child or adult to access the play piece while remaining in their wheelchair. A child or adult using a wheelchair can roll up to the table and contribute to the motion by holding onto the table and rocking their chair back and forth along with the movement. This important design feature allows children to make it sway and move by coordinating their movements back and forth to get it moving and maintain the ride, allowing them to initiate and participate in the play experience. It is expected that this project will impact 415 individuals of all ages that have paralysis-causing conditions and their families. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 3 percent of the total project cost).

Wilderness Inquiry
Minneapolis, MN
$5,000 – Fitness and Wellness
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Paddling Beyond Boundaries, which provides challenging and rewarding kayaking experiences for individuals with spinal cord injury alongside their peers. This project will help Wilderness Inquiry to update its fleet of universally designed sea kayaks. Wilderness Inquiry partners with Current Designs to design and manufacture a universally designed model based on the Libra XT model. The design reflects Wilderness Inquiry's extensive experience and commitment to creating accessible environments for individuals of diverse abilities. Slightly wider than a traditional kayak with an additional cockpit, the watercraft accommodates a wheelchair or other adaptive equipment, allows adaptations for individuals needing additional core support, and can accommodate three paddlers to ensure access for all. The kayaks enable full participation by all individuals in a universal manner that goes unnoticed by most individuals without disabilities. Grant funds will support one accessible kayak upgrade, and will impact 100 individuals with paralysis, ages 5 years old and above. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 9 percent of the total project cost).

YWCA Gettysburg & Adams County

Gettysburg, PA
$7,099 – Facility Accessibility Modifications
This Quality of Life grant will help to support an ADA-Accessible Lift for the Outdoor Pool. The YWCA's aquatics facilities are especially popular among senior citizens and people with disabilities, many of whom rely on the YWCA's water fitness classes and whirlpool to manage joint pain and arthritis, fibromyalgia, and other chronic conditions, enabling them to live a productive and satisfying life. Enrollment in water fitness classes and class offerings continue to grow year after year. There is a demonstrated need for aquatics facilities and programs in the community, and the YWCA strives to make facilities accessible to everyone regardless of physical ability. The indoor pool and the whirlpool each have an ADA-compliant accessibility lift available for use by those who use wheelchairs or who have other disabilities and require assistance getting into and out of the pool and whirlpool. This summer, the YWCA added two outdoor pools a short distance from the facility to expand aquatics offerings. In past years, these pools were operated by a private swim and tennis club, and the owners were not required to install accessibility lifts. Since these pools were opened to YWCA members and guests, it is a legal requirement to install a lift at each of the outdoor pools to provide accessibility for those who need assistance getting into and out of the pool. A generous grant award from a local community foundation funded the purchase and installation of a lift for one of the pools. This Quality of Life grant will support the installation of a lift for the second pool, enabling full inclusion to all aquatic activities offered by the YWCA. A large senior living development is also located in close proximity to this outdoor pool, and many of these residents have been using the pool during the summer months. It is expected that this project will impact at least 50 individuals of all ages with paralysis and other mobility challenges that make it difficult to enter and exit the pool. (This Reeve Foundation Quality of Life grant funds 44 percent of the total project cost).

This project was supported, in part by grant number 90PR3002, from the U.S. Administration for Community Living, Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, D.C. 20201. Grantees undertaking projects under government sponsorship are encouraged to express freely their findings and conclusions. Points of view or opinions do not, therefore, necessarily represent official Administration for Community Living policy.