A - C

Active Disabled Americans
Key Largo, Florida 33037
$17,000 – Adapted Sports - Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to underwrite the purchase of a pontoon boat that is specially made for use in salt water, and that can accommodate six guests that use wheelchairs and an additional ten individuals on excursions in the waters of the Florida Keys to enjoy swimming, snorkeling, fishing and other activities. This is the only program of its kind in the area, and it provides unparalleled opportunities for individuals living with paralysis to reconnect with nature in ways they may not have thought possible, particularly if their paralysis was caused by spinal cord injury or other trauma. It is expected that at least 192 individuals living with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project.

Adaptive Sports Center of Crested Butte, Inc.
Crested Butte, Colorado 81224
$10,000 – Facility Accessibility Modifications - Bridging Barriers
This Quality of Life grant will help to provide exceptional accessibility at the organization's recently acquired Gothic Lodge by supporting the installation of a new elevator. In addition to the enjoying the many benefits of participating in exciting outdoor sports and recreation, guests that live with paralysis will be able to access all levels of the Lodge to enjoy all of the activities and benefits of inclusive participation in social interaction, preparing and sharing meals, and peer interaction with other participants and family members. The ability to provide accessible lodging for all participants greatly enhances the experience of adapted sports and recreation because it fosters important social interactions and shared learning opportunities beyond the participation in recreational activities. It is expected that at least 75 participants living with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project.

Akron Children's Hospital
Akron, Ohio 44308
$10,000 – Arts – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will support Dance Unlimited, a dance program for children with special needs, including cerebral palsy, spina bifida, spinal cord injury, autism, Downs syndrome, and pulmonary problems. Offered three times per year in 12-week sessions, the program offers children the opportunity to learn various styles of dance, all of which are adapted to fit any ability level. Participants range in age from very young children to adults, with the majority of the dancers being between the ages of 4 and 16 years old. A variety of dance styles, including ballet, contemporary, jazz and hip hop are held once per week with a recital at the end of each session. In addition, the Dance Unlimited troupe performs at various hospital events. Dance Unlimited replaces typical physical therapy sessions with the physical goals of improved strength, flexibility, balance, coordination, proprioception, posture and alignment in sitting or standing, endurance, walking pattern, and functional skills. Older patients are also included in the program as either dancers or assistant instructors, depending upon their interests. Grant funds will support the purchase of 3 sports wheelchairs, mouthsticks, 3 sets of adapted foam grips, costumes, facility rental, and t-shirts. It is expected that 75 individuals living with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project.

Angelica Patient Assistance Program
New York, New York 10022
$$8,495 – Arts Program – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will support creativity workshops for young men that have become spinal cord injured as a result of gun violence, to enable them to frame, develop and share their experiences, identify personal goals and needs, and ultimately, reintegrate into the community. In addition to teaching participants to effectively tell their stories, the project aims to provide each and every participant with personalized digital training across the most current and relevant platforms in the industry, equipping each man with valuable publishing skills. Angelica's mission is to improve the lives of approximately 800 individuals that receive rehabilitative and long-term medical care at Coler Hospital on Roosevelt Island and Carter Hospital in Harlem, most of whom are persons of color who are economically disadvantaged. Funds will be used to pay for an arts ethnographer to work with 48 participants who live with paralysis and equipment to capture their stories in twelve podcasts. It is expected that 48 individuals that live with paralysis caused by spinal cord injury will be impacted by this project.

Association of Programs for Rural Independent Living
Little Rock, Arkansas 72212
$15,500
This Quality of Life grant will support the Youth Conference component of the Annual APRIL Conference that enables youth with disabilities to have a place to build their community, share their experiences, and learn skills for overcoming barriers and issues faced by young people with disabilities that live in rural areas. The APRIL Youth conference provides an opportunity for young people from across the country, especially (but not limited to) those in rural areas, to learn independent living skills, gain peer support and a sense of community, and learn advocacy and leadership skills to take back to their communities. Many have an opportunity to travel away from home for the first time and gain confidence in their abilities to take control of their lives. The day-long youth conference teaches sessions on standing up for yourself, how to make change in your community, what your rights are as a person with a disability, disability history, culture, identity, and current topics that affect their lives. The conference is planned and executed by a committee of volunteer youth with disabilities that have attended in prior years. There is also a youth track throughout the entire conference with workshops that vary in topics from lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (lgbtq+), healthy relationships, writing letters to officials, etc. There are also many activities and opportunities for peer support and building a strong community, including a dance and mixer settings to meet other professionals and grow their soft skills and network. The young people in attendance range from age 15-30 and have both physical and invisible disabilities. The goal is to have a total of 120 youth with disabilities from across the country attend the conference in Spokane, Washington in October 2017, and it expected that approximately 60 participants living with paralysis. These young people typically have gone through a state leadership program or are affiliated with a Center for Independent Living as a volunteer or consumer of services. Grant funds will help to support fifteen scholarships for youth that live with paralysis to attend the 2017 APRIL Conference.

BACKBONES
Prospect Heights, Illinois 60070
$3,600 – Fitness and Wellness – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Discover Yoga Workshops for individuals with spinal cord injury. These workshops invite both instructors interested in adapting their practice to meet the needs of students of all abilities, and students with disabilities to explore the possibilities yoga practice can bring to one's well-being. Both instructors and students come into the workshop with a spirit of trial and error and open dialogue. The needs of students with disabilities are addressed, as well as questions and misconceptions. Ideally, each workshop will consist of 5-10 student participants with spinal cord injury or similar disability; 5-10 teacher participants; and 2-3 volunteers. Caregivers and family members are encouraged to attend so they may gain knowledge and skills in assisting someone with SCI/D at home in their personal yoga and meditation practice. Students are provided with a take-home guide to help them practice at home. Instructors leave the workshop with tools and skills to create an inclusive yoga experience in their community. The model for this workshop is effective because it creates a space for conversations among student and instructor promoting better understanding and addressing possible barriers or fears. BACKBONES plans to host yoga workshops for people with spinal cord injuries or other disabilities (class is open to people of all abilities) in Arizona, New York in Florida. Grant funds will support honorariums for yoga instructors, honorariums for meditation practitioners, and yoga kits for participants. It is expected that 45 individuals living with paralysis will be impacted by this project.

Camp Millhouse
South Bend, Indiana 46614
$6,140 – Facility Accessibility Modifications – Bridging Barriers
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the aquatic program at Camp Millhouse, which provides camping experiences in a natural and wooded environment to individuals of all ages and varying abilities. Programs include an outdoor swimming pool, music programs, arts and crafts, gardening, nature programs and nature trail walks, indoor and outdoor sports, an outdoor low ropes challenge course, singing around the campfire, and more. The pool lift will greatly enhance the pool experience for campers and staff, as more campers will be able to get in and out of the pool faster, more easily and with increased safety and dignity. This means that campers can spend more time enjoying the water. The loungers are extremely well-suited for campers with low mobility. The lounger float provides a more fixed, stable, and secure seat in the pool for campers with difficulty supporting their own weight, making them feel more comfortable and providing a more relaxed experience while enjoying the pool. Grant funds will support the installation of the lift and the purchase of six pool loungers. It is expected that 300 individuals with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project.

Canine Companions for Independence
Medford, New York 11763
$6,140 – Service Animal Program – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to improve the client training experience for Canine Companions. The Canine Companions for Independence Northeast Regional Training Facility is located in Medford, New York and serves 13 states from Maine to Virginia. The training facility is fully wheelchair accessible and outfitted with 13 dorm rooms, laundry room, training rooms and dining area. Clients come and stay at the training facility during their 2-weeks of training with their new assistance dog. Due to the large area the Northeast covers, rooms are provided for our clients. Staying at the facility allows clients all the comforts of home so they can focus on their training. Grant funds will help to underwrite the purchase and installation of a new commercial ice machine to replace one that broke last year. Grant funds will also support the purchase of 11 lift chairs to be placed in the wheelchair accessible dorm rooms, providing clients with comfort and ease of getting out of the chair with little or no assistance. It will also allow clients who have difficulty sleeping to sleep upright and also help to elevate the legs to help with circulation. The commercial ice machine helps clients stay hydrated and is also used for icing to help reduce inflammation for many clients.

Central California Adaptive Sports Center
Shaver Lake, California 93664
$7,030 – Adapted Sports – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will support Outdoor Adaptive Sports Adventures for Persons with Disabilities in Central California. Specifically, grant funds will support the purchase of a semi prone-position, hand-cranked mountain bike. This bike enables a high degree of independence in the sport of adaptive cross-country mountain biking, and is considered state-of-the art in the sport. It will expand the availability of adapted bicycles and enable more people to be able to participate. It is expected that 112 individuals that live with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project.

Central Kentucky Riding for Hope
Lexington, Kentucky 40583
$2,700 – Therapeutic Horseback Riding – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support a range of therapeutic riding activities for adult riders that live with paralysis. Participation in therapeutic horseback riding has been shown to improve physical activity, socialization, overall physical and mental health, and communication and relationship skills; to decrease depression and anxiety; and to help participants achieve their individualized goals developed by the collaborating therapist, i.e. physical, occupational, speech and mental health. Grant funds will support the costs of the lead instructor. It is expected that this project will impact 12 individuals living with paralysis and their families.

Changing Gaits Inc.
Brook Park, Minnesota 55007
$5,000 – Therapeutic Horseback Riding – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will support the expansion of healing therapeutic horseback riding programs to children living with paralysis caused by spina bifida, multiple sclerosis, and cerebral palsy. The program is designed to work with children with movement disabilities and help them to improve their range of movement, balance, and coordination. These improvements help riders to be more self-sufficient and that gives them a greater sense of self confidence. Grant funds will support riding scholarships for 100 individuals.

Charleston County Park & Recreation Commission
Charleston, South Carolina 29412
$16,791 – Facility Accessibility Modifications – Bridging Barriers
This Quality of Life grant supports the Folly Beach County Park Adaptive Beach Access project which consists of purchasing and installing 71 4'x6' durable plastic mats to be used to improve access to the guarded beach area. The mats will be joined using the 6' sides of the mat, creating a 6' wide path. Once the mats are placed, fasteners will be added to secure the mats creating a more permanent access solution. Maintenance staff will blow sand off of the mats every morning to keep the pathways clear of obstructions. The mats will stay in place during the beach season, March to October. They will be taken up during the off season and stored. These mats will provide a hard, stable surface for people with mobility limitations to have access to the beach. It is expected that at least 190 individuals living with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project.

Chase Your Dreams Foundation
Mandeville, Louisiana 70470
$5,000 – Assistive Technology Initiative – Bridging Barriers
This Quality of Life grant will support an innovative program that will provide Independence Packs to 10 individuals that live with new spinal cord injuries in the New Orleans area. The Independence Packs are filled with a variety of low-tech items that have been proven to be very helpful for increasing independence after the onset of paralysis. Each Independence Pack will contain: NITE IZE Figure 9 Carabiner – Large; Upgraded Zipper Pulls; Evaporative cooling towel; Good Grips Button Hook; Super Big Fat Pen (5 Pack); NuMuv Gripping Aide; KEY-BAK SUPER48 Xtreme Duty Retractable Key Ring; Zubits Magnetic Shoeslace closures; Flipside wallet; Dining with dignity utensils (Fork and Spoon); EaZyHold (Therapy pack); Harness Push Gloves; Osprey spin 32 backpack; as well as the Reeve Foundation Paralysis Resource Guide and other Paralysis Resource Center materials. Recipients of the Independence Packs will also be contacted to receive follow up outreach.

Child Development and Rehabilitation Center
Eugene, Oregon 97403
$3,658 – Camp – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will support the Go Baby Go project, which provides a means by which young children with disabilities can move around on their own. Specifically, toy ride-on trucks are modified with joysticks so that children can steer in the direction they want to go and more easily play with their peers. Go Baby Go was founded by Professor Cole Galloway as part of a research project at the University of Delaware, and the program has expanded to more than 40 communities where volunteers are trained to modify the vehicles so more children have access to them. The trucks for this project will use modifications that are different from the original Go Baby Go cars that have buttons, in that they have easy steering, a zero-turn radius, adjustable speed and acceleration, and a joystick holder that can be positioned to suit a particular child. The physical therapists at the CDRC work with children with a variety of paralysis causing conditions including cerebral palsy, myotonic dystrophy, muscular dystrophy, stroke, and brain tumors. A large percentage of clients seen at the CDRC are living below the poverty line. Furthermore, the high cost of a power wheel chair for a young child is prohibitive for most families. Therefore, the children that would benefit from this proposed project are underserved and have no alternative for getting around other than being carried or wheeled by another person. These modified ride-on trucks would enable a group of children between the ages of two and eight to be able to navigate on their own for the first time in their lives. The trucks would be provided at no cost to the families, and will be modified by middle school students that are members of the robotics team. Grant funds will support tools and supplies to modify 8 ride-on trucks and facility rental of space for the two-day workshops, as well as set up and clean up, supervision of students, publicity, registration services, and consultation about working with middle school students. Eight children that live with paralysis and their families will directly benefit from this project.

Children's Healthcare of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia 30329
$3,500 – Camp – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Camp Krazy Legs, an overnight camp for children and teens with spina bifida (ages 7-18). This camp has grown exponentially from 44 campers in 2014 to a projected 65 campers in 2017. Camp Krazy Legs has had a waitlist every year and strives to expand its capacity to accommodate every child who wants to attend. A wide variety of activities are offered to children, as well as high quality of medical care available during camp and a mentoring system for campers at every level. At the end of camp, campers have made new friends, learned new strategies to navigate daily life with paralysis and created memories that will last a lifetime. Grant funds will help to support camper scholarships for 65 children and teens that live with spina bifida.

City of Mondovi
Mondovi, Wisconsin 54755
$1,000 – Accessible Playground – Bridging Barriers
This Quality of Life grant will support an initiative to upgrade the accessibility at Mirror Lake Park Playground, which will be the only accessible public playground in a 16-mile radius. This is a small rural community of about 2,770 people that has 5 city parks. The existing playground equipment was installed over 20 years ago, and is not setup to accommodate people with special needs. The park already has an accessible fishing pier. Grant funds will support the purchase and installation of a wheelchair accessible picnic table. It is expected that at least 18 individuals living with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project.

Community Sailing of Colorado
Denver, Colorado 80250
$6,900 – Facility Accessibility Modifications
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the installation of an ADA-approved dock at the Community Sailing of Colorado's flagship location at The Marina at Cherry Creek State Park, out of which is has operated for over 15 years. The goal is to provide a safe platform for participants to rig boats, launch and return safely back to shore. This includes assisted transfers to and from boats along with accommodating access to docks. The new dock will also be home to the mobile lift that has enabled the program to support more inclusive sailing to those with limited mobility or wheelchair users. The accessible dock will make the entire waterfront accessible, and greatly expands the program's capacity because it will accommodate four boats at once. It is expected that this project will impact 2,500 individuals living with paralysis and their families.

Compassions Training and Awareness Center
Cleveland, Ohio 44112
$3,000 – Caregiving – Caring and Coping
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the Specialized Spinal Cord Injury Caregiver Job Training and Placement Program. Compassions was founded in 2008 by a woman that has over twenty-seven years of first-hand experience and understanding the special needs of individuals living with spinal cord paralysis. She was punched through a second story window during a domestic dispute, and broke her neck and now lives with paralysis due to her spinal cord injury and dependent on home care workers for her daily living needs. She and countless others have suffered some form of abuse at the hands of poorly trained and uneducated home care workers. This program provides a positive impact while assisting in improving the lives of people living with spinal cord paralysis and other limiting disabilities, while providing job opportunities for individuals from our low-income communities. Currently there is no other organization or business in or around Cleveland or beyond that offers such a program or provides such a service. Compassions strives to initiate, improve and enhance the current standards and curriculum of the home care/health care training service industry, while initiating a contemporary and specialized job training and placement program. The state of Ohio currently does not require any kind of certification for home health aides. Home health agencies require a simple application for employment, and rarely perform any background checks or training. The lack of professional requirements for home health aides is especially galling given the intimacy of the relationship between home health aide and client, and the client's dependence on home health aides for meals, personal hygiene and housework. Grant funds will help to support the purchase of uniforms and supplies. It is expected that grant funds will impact 1,000 individuals living with paralysis and their families.

Crater Regional Workforce Development Board/Learn To Earn, Inc. (CRWDB/LTE)
Petersburg, Virginia 23803
$6,000 – Employment Program – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support a project that will develop and distribute information packets introducing the Social Security Administration's (SSA) Ticket to Work (TtW) program to school-based transition services for students with disabilities. The information packets will be distributed to administrators and special education staff within the 8 school districts served. The packets will include a request for the program and service-related information to be shared with transitioning students (ages 17-21) and their families and caregivers, as well as a request for CRWDB/LTE and school staff to meet and discuss partnership opportunities. Grant funds will support the project coordinator and service provider to develop all project materials, host informational sessions, and travel to and from 8 participating area schools. It is expected that 100 individuals living with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project.

D - I

Destination Rehab Bend
Oregon 97701
$6,520 – Camp – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Adventure Rehab Camp, a five day, rehab adventure vacation for underserved individuals with paralysis and a family member or caregiver, with a total of 16 participants. Participants are recruited from throughout the rural communities of Central and Eastern Oregon which are some most underserved populations in the state. The program targets individuals with paralysis caused by stroke, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, spina bifida, brain injury and cerebral palsy. Once a cohort is identified, they will participate in education sessions and remote meetings leading up to their camp experience. Connections are made with potential resources in each participant's home town, allowing for follow up and additional resourcing post-camp. Participants will travel to Bend, Oregon and will spend five days and four nights in accessible dorm housing at Central Oregon Community College, and they will be assigned a physical therapist for the duration of the camp. Each person will have an initial evaluation and goal setting session with their physical therapist to set short and long term goals relating to wellness, quality of life and participation. Throughout the five days, participants will be involved in a variety of outings and classes, including adaptive sports, fitness classes, educational sessions, skills training and local outings. Oregon Adaptive Sports will provide the equipment, training, fitting and staffing for adaptive sport outings such as rock climbing, cycling and kayaking. Fitness classes will include strengthening sessions, Pilates and Yoga, with appropriate adaptations taught to each individual. Family and caregivers will be included in many of the activities, but they will also have separate programming and education sessions, to allow them to address their unique needs. Participants and their support team will visit local sites such as the Natural History Museum, restaurants and historic theater. They will practice functional skills and address limitations while learning to navigate in a new environment. At the end of the camp, each participant will be given a summary of their goal status, and they will write up an action plan for utilizing what they have learned as they return to home. Grant funds will support personnel costs for the program director, a licensed physical therapist who is responsible for planning, coordination, marketing and supervision of Adventure Rehab Camp; Oregon Adaptive Sports, to provide equipment, training and staffing for adaptive sport outings including cycling, kayaking and rock climbing; Pilates instructor and adaptive Pilates instructor; accessible van rental; accommodations for participants and volunteers; and travel for recruitment efforts. This project will impact 16 individuals, including 8 people living with paralysis and their respective family caregivers that accompany them.

Disability Resources, Inc.
Sparks, Nevada 89431
$16,830 – Employment Program – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant support the New2U Computers Employment Development Program, which offers several unique services to the community, including opportunities for individuals with disabilities to gain the knowledge, skills, and work experience in a warehouse, electronic recycling and information technology field. The Employment Development Program provides paid on-the-job training to individuals living with a disability to achieve permanent and meaningful employment, and assists individual participants with all stages of employment seeking, placement and retention. The program targets the career path of employment in warehouse, recycling and technology fields. These positions play an integral role in the success of a company's bottom line and consumer satisfaction, and without experience, most individuals are unable to secure employment in this field. Used computers are donated by local businesses and individuals, and the program trains individuals how to refurbish the equipment, which is then provided at no or very low cost to low-income families that may not be able to afford a computer. All donated computers are re-built or recycled with the help of individuals in the Employment Development Program. Anything that is no longer serviceable is recycled through certified R2 recyclers. These companies are regulated to ensure all materials are recycled green while keeping toxic waste out of landfills. This helps to reduce the amount of resources used to produce new electronic items, while creating new jobs in our community. Grant funds will support programmatic equipment, Bullard Sentinel2 Ratchet Headgear; Bullard Sentinel2 Clear Face Shield Visors; Classic Pro Tech Toolkits; 26-Bit Driver Kits; Regal Seating Bucket Seat Stools; Antifog Ice Wraparounds Safety Glasses; Square Edge Adjustable Height 2-person Workbench with Panel Legs, Outlet Panel, Electronic Riser; Garner HD-2 Hard Drive & Tape Degausser; 110-120VAC and Commercial Door Opener Pro Model; plus shipping and handling for above items. This project is expected to impact at least 15 individuals living with paralysis that participate in the Employment Development Program.

Eagle Mount Billings
Billings, Montana 59102
$6,000 – Adaptive Sports – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Adaptive Ski Training and Transition, the Eagle Mount Billings Ski program education and training for staff and core volunteers. The last formal national training for ski staff and volunteer group took place in 2011. The knowledge base and equipment of adaptive skiing is ever changing and the importance of education and training is imperative to providing a safe and high-quality program. The core training team consists of a total of 16 individuals that comprising staff and volunteers. Grant funds will support a large portion of training expenses for eight individuals who attended a week-long national adaptive ski and snowboard training and the training expenses for the remaining eight in the core team in addition to 70 volunteers prior to the start of ski season. Continuing education clinics focused on all aspects of adaptive skiing and snowboarding for a wide array of abilities cannot be found anywhere else. The clinics focus on mono-skis, bi-skis, prosthetics, 3-track amputees, 4-track, HI/VI teaching, movement analysis, tethering techniques, outrigger usage, skiing assessment, etc. Current education and training for staff and volunteers ensures that each skier will be paired with a qualified and knowledgeable trainer that will teach them current instruction models and reinforce the national standards of safety protocols for of adaptive skiing. It is expected that this program will impact at least 15 individuals living with paralysis.

Easter Seals Southwest Human Development
Phoenix, Arizona 85008
$5,000 – Assistive Technology Initiative – Bridging Barriers
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the ADAPT Shop Parent-Toddler Playtime Groups, which are play-based, strength-based, and parent directed. Each session will be designed to meet the special needs and interests of the children and families who attend. A fun and encouraging atmosphere will be provided to help children become engaged and motivated to use their full range of skills and abilities during activities and interactions with other children. Parents and caregivers will be offered support, guidance and information to help support successful group experiences for their child and themselves. The proposed Parent-Toddler Playtime Group will have four sessions during the grant awarded year. Each session will consist of six weekly group meetings which would run for 90 minutes. The Parent-Toddler Playtime Groups will be an enriched educational and therapeutic setting facilitated by two members of the ADAPT Shop staff, which include pediatric occupational, speech, and physical therapist as well as developmental special instructors. Playtime Group topics and activities will be designed to support successful social interactions with peers, finding effective communication strategies, using equipment such as custom seating, slant boards, light tables, and adapted books to play and learn, and developing independent mobility with the use of mobile scooters, walkers, and gait trainers. Each Playtime group session will involve sharing information, modeling and consultation with parents and caregivers on the various techniques that can encourage interaction between children.

Eastern Adaptive Sports
Ashland, New Hampshire 03217
$17,004 – Adaptive Sports – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Adaptive Sports Cycling Program Expansion, which will serve all levels of cyclists, from beginners to competitive road warriors. This can be accomplished by providing participants with the proper equipment and individualized instruction, enabling more children and adults to participate. Grant funds will help to support the acquisition of two recumbent Green Speed handcycles, one Force RX handcycle, and one 5' x10' cargo trailer. The trailer will be used to transport the cycles to events with partner organizations on the weekends, helping to foster a more cohesive cycling community comprising athletes of all abilities. It is expected that 160 individuals of all ages that live with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project.

Elkhart Lake-Glenbeulah School District (ELGSD)
Elkhart Lake, Wisconsin 53020
$5,000 – Accessible Playground/Ballfield – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the renovating the elementary and middle school playground into an inclusive playground and therapy extension center to better serve the increased number of students and community members that live with disabilities including paralysis. The ELGSD consists of two villages: Elkhart Lake and Glenbeulah, and areas of 5 townships. There are two school buildings located on the ELGSD campus. Students in 4-year old kindergarten through grade 8 attend the elementary/middle school (which also houses an on-site daycare for 3 to 12 year olds) and students in grades 9-12 attend the high school. A playground area and football field separate the buildings, which makes it very easy for students and staff to commute between the two buildings to teach and or attend classes and activities at either. The total student population is approximately 500 students, and the day care provides services to approximately 120 children. Elkhart Lake and Glenbeulah are both small rural communities, and the school district is the "heart" of the community, and the facilities are used by many community groups and organizations. An inclusive playground will benefit the entire school population as well as all the people in the community, including year-round residents and the many summer residents. The accessible playground will also enable parents, grandparents and others who have a disability to now have the ability and opportunity to go to a playground and interact and enjoy with their children/grandchildren. Grant funds will support accessible playground equipment. This project is expected to impact at least 25 individuals living with paralysis and their families.

Empower Spinal Cord Injury
Boston, Massachusetts 02114
$18,140 – Camp – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Empower Spinal Cord Injury, Broadening Impact: Mastering Wheelchair Skills and Expanding West, a project that will add a West Coast Residential Summer Program, and expand the Outreach Day Clinic programs to teach wheelchair skills to students, therapists and wheelchair-users. Shorter length of stays as well as a host of complicating factors during inpatient rehabilitation can negatively impact an individual's traditional inpatient rehabilitation experience. At Empower SCI, individuals are at least 1-year post injury, and come to the program with personal, concrete goals that they set themselves. Participants are ready to expand their knowledge and seek out ways to overcome barriers to living a happy, meaningful life. One-on-one therapy sessions focus on personalized goals, while group rehabilitation counseling, peer mentoring and recreation opportunities offer emotional support and effective coping strategies. The educational series empowers participants to take control of their own lives, with class topics including sexuality, return to work, return to travel, and caregiver management. By traveling away from their traditional caregivers, participants have the opportunity to reevaluate their routines. The residential nature of the program allows participants to work toward their goals 24 hours per day, by establishing more independent routines during individual therapy sessions, and then carrying them out with residential aides throughout the rest of the day. Empower SCI camp is fully volunteer-staffed, with over 60 volunteers working together with a shared focus of helping each participant achieve their self-identified goals. Although the program is only 2 weeks in length, Empower SCI participants report long-lasting impacts due to the intensive rehabilitation model that addresses both physical and emotional well-being. With focus on real-world function, round-the-clock interventions, exploring new passions, and learning from peers, clients leave the Empower SCI program with new skills, greater independence, and a better understanding of their potential. In addition to the summer program, Empower SCI also offers Wheelchair Skills Courses to individuals through their Outreach Day Clinics. Wheelchair-users, clinicians and students in healthcare professions have the opportunity to attend these courses. The courses provide education about appropriate wheelchair set-up, techniques for efficient propulsion, and working towards navigating community terrain, including wheelies, curbs, and even stairs. Grant funds will support personnel costs to conduct expansion of outreach for the Empower SCI and Wheelchair Skills Training programs, both in Boston and on the West Coast, as well as travel expenses related to both programs. It is expected that at least 31 individuals with spinal cord injury and their families will be impacted by this project.

Free Wheelchair Mission
Irvine, California 92618
$24,000 – Durable Medical Equipment – Bridging Barriers
This Quality of Life grant will help to support COMMUTER Wheelchairs to Promote Self-Sufficiency and Independence. In the developing world, an estimated 100 million people need wheelchairs due to paraplegia, but are unable to obtain them. A sedentary lifestyle increases the risk of coronary artery disease, obesity and diabetes but physical disability also places a financial hardship on families due to additional expenses and a reduction in potential family income. A wheelchair which enables people with disabilities to propel themselves longer distances to school or work helps minimize the financial risk to families in the developing world when one person is not able to contribute to the family income and increases the health of the person with paraplegia. The COM was designed specifically for people with physical disabilities and paralysis of the lower limbs, but who have sufficient upper body strength to propel themselves. These people can be self-sufficient with the proper wheelchair or assistive device. The COM wheelchair is a user driven innovation. Free Wheelchair Mission users asked for a hand-powered or cycled trike with a low center of gravity to prevent unplanned dismounts and tip overs. Wheelchair users in the developing world also face the physical barriers of inaccessibility without ramps, curb cutouts and paved roads. The COM is maneuverable, stable, and suitable for use in harsh outdoor conditions with unpaved terrain on the high slope elevations found in rural and mountainous areas. The COM enables an entire subgroup of healthy, strong people with mobility issues to be contributing members of society as students, employees, entrepreneurs, consumers, producers, taxpayers, beneficiaries and citizens. The COM was designed to help users avoid falling from the wheelchair when going over bumps or obstacles, to prevent repetitive strain injuries from wheelchair overuse including tendinitis, carpal tunnel, and muscle strain, and provide cargo carrying capabilities for street vending. Grant funds will support half of the expenses for phase two of the COM field tests in Vietnam, Mexico and China, including manufacturing new prototypes with the modifications to the COM from data found in phase one of the field tests, and additional training for distribution partners and the follow up visits to COM users with ongoing communication and data collection during field trials. Grant funds will support personnel expenses for the medical programs trainer to plan and prepare the curriculum and provide in-field training, and 132 132 COM Wheelchair Hand-pedal trikes. It is expected that 132 individuals living with paraplegia will be impacted by this project.

Girls on the Run of Lancaster
Lancaster, Pennsylvania 17601
$7,146 – Fitness and Wellness – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Girls On The Run Empowered – An Adapted Program to be Accessible to Girls of All Abilities. The current GOTR curriculum is a powerful research based program that considers the whole girl - body, brain, heart, spirit and social connection - in a positive, structured space where girls can learn about themselves, explore new ideas, cultivate empathy and strengthen connections. Through well-structured easy to administer lessons, it teaches life skills including treating others with care, practicing gratitude and managing emotions. Physical activity is woven into the program to inspire an appreciation for fitness and healthy habits. The Girls on the Run Empowered team coaches have modified the games and physical activity components to allow girls with physical and/or cognitive disabilities to experience the life lessons and participate in the exercises that best suit their particular individual needs. They also enjoy the benefits of integration with those participating in the original curriculum. Leveraging the expertise of these coaches GOTR, Lancaster is seeking to expand the accessibility of the program beyond this team to provide training and guidance to coaches of teams that include those with a wide range of physical disabilities and orthopedic impairment including Cerebral Palsy, amputations, congenital abnormalities, and Spinal Cord Injury and to better support coaches who may be addressing other milder physical and cognitive disabilities on their teams. This project will focus on developing a model that is a more individualized set of practices and program modifications to allow girls to access and actively participate in the program. To support this model, GOTR of Lancaster will develop a PE Closet that includes essential tools and equipment for the adapted model. Access to this equipment will facilitate inclusion to girls of all levels of disabilities from mild, moderate and severe.

The project will include a training component. Each season there is a comprehensive training schedule for new and returning coaches to the program to ensure the quality of the program is maintained. For the Fall Season 2017, an additional coaches training session will be dedicated to guidance on program administration for girls with disabilities. Grant funds will support fitness equipment including Therabands, scooters, scooter storage cart, adapted bicycles, and fitness balls. It is expected that this project will impact at least 70 girls living with paralysis and their families.

Global Mobility
Van Nuys, California 91405
$13.650 – Durable Medical Equipment – Bridging Barriers
This Quality of Life Grant will help to support The Vietnam Wheelchair Seating Clinic project, which will take place over approximately 7-10 days in November 2017. Using a Global Mobility's in-country partner, Da Nang Orthopedic and Rehabilitation Hospital, will use Global Mobility's wheelchair request form to identify 180 people with disabilities, including 80 with paralysis, and provide Global Mobility with each client's age, diagnosis if known, and measurements. After gathering the appropriate wheelchairs, Global Mobility will ship them in a 40-foot ocean container that will also contain additional ambulatory aids such as walkers and canes. Da Nang Orthopedic and Rehabilitation Hospital will receive the container and facilitate in-country customs clearance as well as transportation of the equipment to the hospital, where the clinic will be held. Global Mobility staff and seating specialists will work with the hospital staff, including several PTs and OTs, to properly seat each client in a wheelchair that is custom-fit to meet his or her needs. An important part of this project is increasing the knowledge of local medical professionals, including hospital staff at the Da Nang Orthopedic and Rehabilitation Hospital, in proper wheelchair seating and repair. This will provide a local, ongoing resource for any repairs and adjustments that the wheelchair recipients might need on their wheelchairs after the clinic. The healthcare professionals trained through this project will be able to properly seat new clients, providing more people with disabilities in Vietnam with the wheelchairs they need to stay healthy and break free of the limits that a life without mobility can cause. In addition, caregivers will be trained on proper positioning to ensure that the wheelchair is safe and comfortable for the user. They will also be taught basic maintenance and repair techniques so that minor wear-and-tear issues can be addressed in the home as appropriate. Grant funds will support the rehab technicians and 60 wheelchairs. It is expected that at least 80 individuals living with paralysis will be impacted by this project.

Grand Traverse Regional Land Conservancy
Traverse City, Michigan 49684
$10,000 – Fitness and Wellness – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Universal Access for The Overlook Trail at Arcadia Dunes: The C.S. Mott Nature Preserve. The new universally accessible dune trail will be a firm path that empowers people of all ages and physical abilities to move through the forest to a platform overlooking Lake Michigan. Over 3,000 acres of land in Benzie and Manistee counties has been permanently protected in the Arcadia Dunes: C.S. Mott Nature Preserve. These lands contain more than three miles of Lake Michigan shoreline, towering scenic bluffs, state-designated “critical dunes,” high quality forests and agricultural parcels. Today, Arcadia Dunes is one of the most used Conservancy-owned preserves with 15 miles of trails used by hikers, bikers, naturalists and birdwatchers from all over the region. The existing trail system winds through challenging hiking terrain of hilly sand dunes leading to spectacular views of Lake Michigan. The trails are difficult for anyone other than able-bodied persons to navigate, limiting access and enjoyment of the natural and scenic beauty found there. The Overlook Trail is relatively flat, six feet wide and one-half mile long, utilizing a series of switchbacks to keep the gradient manageable for wheelchairs and other mobility devices. The pathway winds through coastal dunes leading to breathtaking views from high bluffs overlooking Lake Michigan and the Herring Lakes. The boardwalk offers a unique experience of meandering through a heavily wooded area of the coastal back dune which has a fantastic array of spring wildflowers and large older trees. The boardwalk is strategically placed to provide visitors with a visual, tactile and olfactory experience of the forest. Grant funds will be used to support the accessible boardwalk. It is expected that 11,100 individuals living with paralysis will be impacted by this project.

Hesperian Health Guides
Berkeley, California 94704
$12,202 – Media Development – Caring & Coping
This Quality of Life grant will help to support a project to adapt A Health Handbook for Women with Disabilities into French for use in Burkina Faso; and once completed Hesperian will support the broad distribution in West Africa. Hesperian will partner with l'Union nationale des associations de femmes handicapées du Burkina Faso (UNAFEHB), a coalition of organizations by and for women with disabilities, in creating the adaptation of A Health Handbook for Women with Disabilities, and will lay the groundwork for their organizing campaign, support the development of campaign specific materials, and facilitate outreach and engagement of women with disabilities throughout Burkina Faso. Hesperian will draw on more than 40 years of experience creating easy-to-understand health information, in particular on women's health and community integration for people with disabilities, as well as working with translation and adaptation partners. Both the development process and the distribution of the final resource (in both print and digital formats) will provide empowering information to improve the quality of life for women living with paralysis and other disabilities in Burkina Faso, and throughout West Africa and other French-speaking areas around the world. The French language adaptation of A Health Handbook for Women with Disabilities will become an important resource for women and girls with disabilities and their allies; providing accessible information and tested strategies to inspire advocacy for access to respectful and appropriate healthcare, for equal rights and to promote leadership for girls and women with disabilities. Grant funds will support the Publications Designer to create and adapt book, the consultant fee for French translations, and required indirect costs. It is expected that this project will impact 300,000 individuals living with paralysis.

Independent Living Center of Kern County
Troy, New York 12180
$13,000 – Durable Medical Equipment – Bridging Barriers
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the Repair and Re-Use Project, which accepts donated power wheelchairs from individuals or businesses, cleans and refurbishes them, and gives them to people with disabilities. Power wheelchairs in need of minor repairs such as tires, batteries, arm rest and controllers will be repaired with assistance from a local durable medical equipment shop and a local battery shop. These repaired power wheelchairs will be used to assist those individuals with mobility impairments; and give the independence and ability to take care of their daily needs such as going to the store, doctor, work, social events, etc. Grant funds will support personnel costs for the special projects coordinator, electric wheelchair batteries, battery chargers, wheelchair tires, miscellaneous wheelchair parts for repair, and joysticks. It is expected that 25 individuals living with paralysis will be impacted by this project.

Independent Living Center of the Hudson Valley
Troy, New York 12180
$5,000 – Accessible Transportation – Bridging Barriers
This Quality of Life grant will support Enhancing Wheelchair Accessible Transportation. This grant helps to provide a required match for funding awarded by the New York State Department of Transportation for the purchase of two wheelchair accessible vans to address the transportation barriers that exist for individual that use wheelchairs. The two new vans are state of the art, smaller (seating four people, space for a wheelchair user to remain in his/her chair, and space for someone to transfer to a seat and the wheelchair to accompany the individual), which is consistent with consumer needs to travel to ILCHV, or to appointments, often times with an aide and or a family member, or sometimes alone. The two new vans get higher gas mileage and will need fewer repairs. These wheelchair accessible vans provide accessible transportation for consumers that do not have access to any public transportation nor the resources to use private taxis, and are part of the short-term support consumers many need towards independence. It is expected that 50 individuals living with paralysis will be impacted by this project.

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Kentucky-Indiana Paralyzed Veterans of America
Floyds Knobs, Indiana 47119
$6,349 – Fitness and Wellness
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Spinal Cord Community Health & Wellness, a project that will enable individuals with spinal cord injury to work out to increase their fitness level and well-being. In direct contrast to a physical therapy atmosphere, this project aims to provide participants with an authentic work out experience. Personal trainers will assist with individualized exercise programs and progress tracking. Participants will receive motivational health and wellness education specific to the needs of individuals with spinal cord injuries and diseases, such as nutrition, skincare, autonomic dysreflexia, adaptive sports equipment, weight management, and more. The project will increase the confidence of participants to encourage the continued pursuit of fitness through adaptive sports participation. Grant funds will support the purchase of the following adaptive exercise equipment for placement at space provided by Louisville Metro Parks at the Berrytown Adaptive & Inclusive Recreation Facility: Challenge Circuit 7000 (accessible weight equipment that provides an upper body workout with little or no assistance required); Saratoga Cycle (a hand-cycle mounted on a specially equipped table so that a wheelchair user can roll up to the table and get a cardio workout); Adaptive Nordic Skiing Machine (effective, roll up, cardio machine); and a set of dumbbells. It is expected that 50 individuals living with paralysis will be impacted by this project.

Lady Wheelchair Mavericks Dallas VA Basketball Association
Arlington, Texas 76006
$7,404 – Adaptive Sports – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the Lady Wheelchair Mavericks Basketball Team, a nonprofit organization committed to improving the health and well-being of physically disabled women and girls. Participation in active and competitive wheelchair sports promotes both independence and self-confidence; it also encourages development of life-long skills which in turn supports the maintenance of a healthy life style. The program emphasizes skills training and leadership development, while also challenging each player to actively give back through volunteer work in the community and schools. The Lady Mavericks has been providing opportunities for women and girls since 1990. To educate communities about adaptive sports, disabilities, and empower others with physical disabilities to get involved in sports, the Lady Mavericks go out and do exhibitions, reach out to organizations that have individuals with physical disabilities, and visit hospitals of newly injured individuals with spinal cord injuries to mentor them and help to show them the way of life in sport and life with a disability. Further, the Lady Mavericks put on a 3-day women's wheelchair basketball camp just for girls and women with physical disabilities. Attendees get to be physically active, to travel independently, and have the responsibility of daily tasks like showering, getting dressed, getting from one play to another on time, but have the support of other women. Attendees have an increase in self-esteem, confidence, empowerment and a new understanding of how they can manage everyday life and have luggage, plane travel, etc. It is the only women's wheelchair basketball camp in the country. Grant funds will support the purchase of 5 MOLTEN Basketballs, 1 Per4max Thunder basketball wheelchair, and 10 Registrations for girls/women to attend the women's basketball development camp. It is expected that this project will impact 50 individuals living with paralysis.

Leaps Of Faith Disabled Waterskiers Club
Sandy Hook, Connecticut 06482
$6,810 – Adaptive Sports – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Summer 2017 Wheels to Water Skis. Leaps of Faith Disabled Waterskiers Club (LOF) will host six adaptive water ski events for rehabilitation hospitals in the tri-state area and throughout the East coast (e.g., Kessler, Burke, Helen Hayes, Mount Sinai, Magee) that serve individuals living with or newly diagnosed with paralysis due to injury or illness including but not limited to spinal cord injury, stroke, brain injury, and multiple sclerosis. Many times after new injury or illness, individuals can benefit from mentoring, support, and education about resources within their communities and area and exposure to specific activities that can promote self-efficacy., LOF is able to provide unique and positive opportunities to participants, who experience physical and emotional empowerment, recreation, quality of life, engagement in lifelong activities, friendships and supports, exposure to new experiences, maintenance and promotion of physical wellness, improved athletic abilities and stamina, and fun for our participants. Grant funds will support the purchase of: a Training Boom, 12 sit ski tow ropes, 6 life vests, boat safety quick release, 2 sit skis, 2 sit ski cages; marine gas, tent rental, accessible port-o-john, award medal, and event liability insurance. It is expected that 150 individuals living with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project, which is provided to them free of charge.

Lowden Aquatic Park Project
Weaverville, California 96093
$7,000 – Facility Accessibility Modifications – Bridging Barriers
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the installation of a commercial grade, ADA-compliant pool chair lift to replace the one that broke at this community swimming pool. This will continue to enable people of all ages and abilities living with paralysis and related mobility impairments and their families and caregivers to enjoy the use of the pool for exercise, to cool off in the very hot summers, and to socialize with other members of the community. Grant funds will support the purchase and installation of the pool chair lift. It is expected that 40 individuals living with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project.

M.D. Wright Academic Center
Thibodaux, Louisiana 70302
$12,495 – Facility Accessibility Modifications – Bridging Barriers
This Quality of Life grant will help to support accessibility modifications at an after-school academic facility created by a young man, Myron Wright, who became paralyzed after a spinal cord injury sustained in a high school football game, and who went on to graduate from high school and college and have an active career. The goal of M.D. Wright Academic Center is to enable at-risk youth with the ability to improve their literacy, math, and overall learning skills to the point where they can succeed in school and develop the educational skills that will prepare them for college along with decreasing high school dropout rates and crime rates among youth locally. Students will be offered homework help, tutoring, SAT/ACT prep, and college admission consulting. The Center will be located in an area where at-risk youth live, with low income, poverty, high crime rate, and drug infestation. M.D. Wright Academic Center will provide students with the ability to generate positive academic outcomes in conjunction with helping them realize their full potential as responsible citizens and leaders. Grant funds will support the installation of a wheelchair ramp. It is expected that at least 5 individuals living with paralysis will be impacted by this project.

Mason's Mission Foundation, Inc.
Lockport, New York 14094
$5,000 – Accessible Playground/Ballfield
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Mason's Mission Park @ Pendleton, an accessible playground in rural western New York. The playground will be a place for children and parents of all abilities play. Play for a disabled child is one of the most important aspects of therapy. Interaction with others and a way to engage with the environment around them is crucial to their development and quality of life. This will be the only inclusive accessible playground within 50 miles that will accommodate special needs children, and this gap affected many families in western New York. Further, after completion of the playground, families will be provided with resources and assistance. Grant funds will help to support the purchase and installation of the wheelchair accessible Merry-Go-Round. It is expected that 1,500 individuals living with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project.

McKenna Farms Therapy Services
Dallas, Georgia 30157
$7,146 – Therapeutic Horseback Riding – Bridging Barriers
This Quality of Life grant will support improved accessibility for innovative therapeutic programs for children with special needs and their families that come from throughout northwest Georgia and metro Atlanta because there is such a great need for services that are offered in a child-friendly, home-like setting. Therapists work as a team through comprehensive interdisciplinary services to help children with special needs achieve their fullest potential. Physical, occupational, and speech therapies are provided in various settings including clinical, aquatic, and through the use of equine movement in hippotherapy and therapeutic riding. By offering all of these services (except for aquatic therapy) in one location, it is convenient for families, and also allows the provision of the highest level of care, as therapists can collaborate for the best interest of the children. Currently, hippotherapy is offered to children with paralysis, but without a lift, services can only accommodate riders up to a certain size and/or age. Grant funds will support the purchase and installation of a lift, which will enable the program to expand to increase the number of children served, as well as the ability to offer services to adults. The lift system will provide improved safety for riders, volunteers, therapists and staff; improve the experience for riders as it will provide a smoother, more dignified transfer; and will expand the number of individuals who are able to participate. The lift will also enable the full launch of the new Horses Helping Heroes program to include therapeutic riding for military veterans along with the group meetings, volunteer opportunities and horsemanship lessons currently offered to veterans. It is expected that this project will impact 30 individuals living with paralysis and their families.

Missouri Governor's Council on Disability (Paraquad-fiscal agent)
St. Louis, Missouri 63110
$6,250 – Advocacy – Bridging Barriers
This Quality of Life grant will help to support The Missouri Youth Leadership Forum (YLF), a collaborative project coordinated by the Governor's Council on Disability (GCD). The YLF is a unique career leadership training program for high school students with disabilities, ages 16 – 21 years, selected from their local communities, to cultivate leadership, citizenship, social, and career development skills at this summer program. Missouri has offered this program for fourteen years and has developed nearly three hundred youth leaders. The Youth Leadership Forum is offered at no cost to the participants (delegates and alumni). Each year, at least ten mentors with a disability travel across the state to convene with the incoming YLF delegates. YLF helps participants develop leadership skills to ensure that all youth with disabilities will realize their full potential; develop career strategies that increase their potential for employment; promote inclusion of people with disabilities in all aspects of society; and participate in advocacy efforts that affect young people with disabilities. These learning opportunities are presented through a peer mentor relationship, and all of the mentors are someone that experiences a disability and the majority are graduates of the YLF. The Youth Leadership Forum is a five, consecutive day program conducted at the University of Missouri, Columbia campus, scheduled on July 17 – 22, 2017. Grant funds will support lodging, travel costs for alumni attending the Forum. It is expected that 40 individuals living with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project.

MTM-CNM Family Connection
Methuen, Massachusetts 01844
$3,033 – Assistive Technology Initiative – Bridging Barriers
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Empowering Through Play: Creating Switch-Adapted Toys for Kids with MTM & CNM, a workshop at the 2017 MTM-CNM Family Conference. MTM-CNM Family Connection is an all-volunteer nonprofit committed to connecting patients and families living with Myotubular Myopathy (MTM) and Centronuclear Myopathy (CNM) with important resources, the most up to date research, and life-enhancing relationships. MTM/CNM is a group of rare neuromuscular conditions (estimated 1 in 50,000 male births) that significantly impact every aspect of muscle strength and endurance. Therefore, individuals affected by MTM/CNM may need to use back braces; a manual or power wheelchair; an adaptive arm lift to provide support and allow movement to interact with power chair controls and communication devices; a gastrostomy tube and feeding pump; and the assistance of a tracheostomy and ventilator as well as a cough assist machine (and suction machines) to clear lung secretions in order to prevent infection and pneumonia. Often premade switch accessible toys are incredibly expensive and marked up from the off-the-shelf version of a toy. Families that participate in this workshop will learn about what kind of toys are readily adaptable and will be inspired to try it at home after having an opportunity to try the process at the conference. The hands-on workshop for families will demonstrate how to adapt simple age-appropriate battery-operated toys switch activation. It will be led by members of the MTM-CNM community; parents who have experience in electronics and adapting toys for their own children. Parents, grandparents, and caregivers will have the opportunity to learn the basics of adapting a toy for switch access by practicing with the provided devices under the guidance of the workshop facilitators. And, children and teens will receive a new device to enjoy with their peers at the conference, which will help facilitate formation of friendships, and then can take it home with them after the conference. There will also be discussion and sharing of various topics related to switch access and assistive technology in general. Grant funds will support stipends for the workshop leaders, compact switches, a variety of age-appropriate toys and devices, wiring supplies, and costs to ship materials to the conference. It is anticipated that 150 individuals living with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project.

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Nevada Paralyzed Veterans of America
Las Vegas, Nevada 89107
$5,450 – Adaptive Sports – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the expansion of Nevada PVA's Adaptive Sports Program in Nevada. The program provides veterans and non-veterans living with spinal cord injury or disease opportunities to participate in recreational sports to empower participants to achieve independent, active lifestyles. Nevada PVA's program is currently conducted in Las Vegas and will be expanded to serve participants in Reno and will add Boccia Ball to the activities offered. This sport is widely known and with assistive devices, can be played by those athletes with severe locomotor disabilities of a cerebral or non-cerebral origin, including individuals with cerebral palsy, stroke, traumatic brain injury, high-level spinal cord injuries, muscular dystrophy, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and arthrogryposis. Assistive devices (ramps, arm or mouth aids) are used to propel the ball. Caregivers or family members can also participate in the sport and assist as needed. Boccia Ball will be offered through clinics and it is anticipated that there will also be an annual tournament. Grant funds will support the purchase and shipping costs of 12 sets of Boccia Ball supplies and materials, 3 Boccia Ball Officials kits, and one-time travel expenses for the Executive Director to establish the program in Reno. It is expected that this project will impact 100 individuals living with paralysis and their families.

NextStep Kansas City
Overland Park, Kansas 66211
$6,277 – Fitness and Wellness – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the purchase and installation of a SCI-FIT Total Body arm and leg machine at the Kansas City region's first dedicated spinal cord injury recovery center, which provides state-of-the-art recovery methods, motivation, and education in a supportive environment to individuals with spinal cord injury paralysis and other paralysis-causing conditions. The addition of the SCI-FIT Pro2 Inclusive Fitness Total Body Exerciser will provide full body integration that facilitates a strong mind connection with activities participants are trying to accomplish, with the opportunity to do those tasks with as little external help as possible. Furthermore, this piece of equipment will give clients that visit us from other cities, and states, something to do outside of their scheduled therapy sessions without needing much assistance from other people. This equipment will provide a more accessible means of independent exercise that promotes better overall health for clients, and improves their cardiovascular, muscular, and nervous systems, as well as their mental state. It is expected that this project will impact 75 individuals living with paralysis and their families.

NextStep Orlando
Longwood, Florida 32750
$3,809 – Fitness and Wellness – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support NeuroRecovery Network training to trainers at NextStep Orlando. Intense physical exercise-based activities can contribute to regained function for individuals living with spinal cord injury, which can improve their independence and overall quality of life. NextStep Orlando serves hundreds of individuals with spinal cord injuries and other neurological disorders including, but not limited to: stroke, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury, and multiple sclerosis. Training courses from the NeuroRecovery Training Institute will better equip trainers to implement locomotor training in 2017. The NeuroRecovery Network (NRN) is "a network of rehabilitation centers charged with developing and providing therapies that promote functional recovery and improve the health of people living with paralysis. Locomotor Training is the principal therapy offered by the NRN to retrain the spinal cord to 'remember' the pattern of walking." In addition, NextStep Orlando will purchase a M130 Medical Treadmill Harness to utilize at the NextStep facility, retraining participants to stand and walk again as they did prior to injury. This medical treadmill harness is the brand used at the NRN Locomotor Training courses and provides the correct postural alignment for a gait pattern. Grant funds will support NRN training for three trainers and the purchase and installation of the M130 Medical Treadmill Harness. It is expected that 150 individuals living with paralysis will benefit from this project.

North Broward Hospital District
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309
$8,440 – (Transition from Institution to Home) Caregiving – Caring and Community
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the Broward Health North Inpatient Rehabilitation Spinal Cord Injury Program for patients with paralysis and related mobility impairments. This project will improve the program through the purchase of current technology and equipment to be used to educate and train patients' families and caregivers in the safe and proper usage of the equipment once the patient moves from the hospital to home, improving the patients' quality of life. Most patients do not receive their durable medical equipment prior to discharge and do not feel comfortable going home without knowing how to use the equipment. Caregivers are very uncomfortable going home without being able to practice using the equipment they will be using every day to assist their family member/patient. This equipment will provide the patient and family caregiver the opportunity to practice using the equipment with the rehab staff assisting to ensure the equipment is used safely and correctly. Patients and family caregivers will feel less anxious and more confident in the transition to home because they have experience working together with the actual equipment that will be used at home. Grant funds will support the purchase of the following durable medical equipment: 1 tilt-in-space Power Wheelchair with joy stick; 2 Roho Wheelchair Cushions with Incontinent Resistant Covers; 1 Oversized Drop Arm Commode; 1 Tilt in Space Shower Chair; 1 set (2) of Knee-Ankle-Foot Orthotics; 1 Beasy Trans Transfer System; 1 Veezee C5 Reacher; 1 PVI Singlefold Ramp; and the following supplies: 1 Sammons Preston Wheelchair Catheter Bag; 1 Wheelchair Cup Holder; 1 set of Rolyan Boot Pillows; 1 Sammons Preseton Transfer Disc (Base and Turntable); and 1 Sammons Preston Oxygen Tank Holder. It is expected that this project will impact 52 individuals living with paralysis and their families.

Oak Island Parks and Recreation Department
Oak Island, North Carolina 28465
$7,340 – Durable Medical Equipment – Bridging Barriers
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the purchase of 3 sand beach wheelchairs to augment the current inventory of 3 sand beach wheelchairs available for loan free-of-charge to community members and visitors. Oak Island is a top vacation destination spot and has a reputation as being a family-friendly vacation site, and has provided sand beach wheelchairs for over 20 years. Visitors come from all over the United States, and during Easter until Labor Day, the population swells weekly by 40,000 to almost 48,500 with residents and visitors. These visitors enjoy the 68 public beach access sites on 13 miles of oceanfront beaches and use the Town's parks and recreation facilities. Oak Island has the largest year round populated beach municipality in the state of North Carolina. The addition of 3 sand beach wheelchairs will reduce the wait time and enable more individuals to utilize the equipment and enjoy the beaches with their families. It is expected that 20,000 individuals living with paralysis and other mobility challenges and their families will be impacted by this project.

Operation Homefront, Inc.
San Antonio, Texas 78232
$4,000 – Caregiving – Caring and Community
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Hearts of Valor, an established, ongoing program that provides direct care and support to the spouses and family caregivers of severely injured or ill veterans, wounded or traumatized post-9/11, including caregivers of service members with spinal cord injuries, paralysis, and traumatic brain injury. The holistic approach focuses on improving caregivers' physical, emotional and behavioral health and well-being, and building friendships among caregivers facing similar challenges and who “walk in their shoes.” Hearts of Valor facilitates caregiver retreats, peer support groups, and online/phone counseling services to equip military caregivers to successfully embrace their critical role over the long haul and not give up. Currently, there are more than 3,200 caregivers in the Hearts of Valor network nationwide, and a total of 70 in-person peer support groups nationally. In many areas where Hearts of Valor operates, caregivers have no access to peer support or group respite opportunities other than those provided by Hearts of Valor, so these services are unduplicated. Grant funds will support wellness events for caregivers, including yoga and other stress relieving activities, painting, and books and materials for support groups. It is expected that 100 family caregivers of severely wounded or ill service members will be impacted by this project.

Peace of Adventure
Colorado Springs, Colorado 80901
$12,000 – Adaptive Sports – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will support the Bike Farm Pisgah Program: Hand Cycle Equipment. Peace of Adventure's (POA) mission is to empower veterans to serve civilians with disabilities through outdoor recreation. By increasing opportunities for outdoor activities, Peace of Adventure aims to facilitate healing and warrior transition for veterans while also enabling civilians with disabilities to live active and healthy lives. Through a variety of outdoor activities from skiing and mountain biking to river rafting and mountaineering, POA's programs push individuals with disabilities beyond what is thought possible in an effort to break social and personal barriers, unite populations, work as a team to create an inclusive environment. Peace of Adventure fosters continued accountability of participants' goals and personal growth long after they complete their outdoor program and come home. In partnership with the Bike Farm Pisgah, Peace of Adventure hosts two types of mountain bike programs throughout the year that empower veterans to serve as mentors for individuals with disabilities in various levels of recovery, healing or wellness: Introductory Off-Road Hand Cycle Clinics and Recovery Rides. The purpose of these week-long programs are to provide POA participants with accessibility opportunities and the skills to navigate the outdoor spaces they would otherwise not have. Through the bike clinic's skills training, community building, access to bike trails, and professional facilitation, the programs are designed to give all participants a sense of purpose and self-confidence as well as employ veteran empowerment and leadership roles for the individuals with disabilities after they leave the event. Grant funds will support the purchase of two new adaptive hand cycles from ReActive Adaptations which will enable POA to create a foundational fleet of equipment for all mountain bike programming, eradicate rental costs for participants, ensure safety, and provide individuals with disabilities the freedom and confidence to navigate trails in innovative ways. The two state-of-the-art bikes include: ReActive Adaptations Bomber Off Road Hand cycle: The Bomber RS has been built to withstand even the toughest tests on the trail, in the backcountry and yet stay lightweight and agile. Rear suspension provides improved ride quality, downhill speed control and improved traction uphill. This off road hand cycle is designed for a rider in the prone body position with spinal cord injuries. This allows the rider to see the terrain ahead more easily, and have the advantage of body weight over the crank set for added power, giving the rider the real mountain bike feel; and ReActive Adaptations Nuke Off road Recumbent Hand cycle: The NUKE Off Road Recumbent hand cycle is a unique, capable, rear wheel drive recumbent hand cycle with rear suspension. The Nuke was developed for riders not able to or not interested in riding in the prone position (kneeling, face down), the recumbent position is preferred by some riders with spinal cord injuries. Rear suspension provides improved ride quality, downhill speed control and improved traction uphill. The 24” wheels provide increased ground clearance, improved traction, increased speed, and a smoother ride for reliability out on the trail. It is expected that this project will impact 21 individuals living with paralysis and their families.

Piers Park Sailing Center
East Boston, Massachusetts 02128
$2,500 – Adaptive Sports – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the purchase a sip-and-puff device for the adaptive sailing program. The primary goal of this assistive technology is to offer people who live with quadriplegia and who are dependent on ventilators the thrill of sailing a boat and experiencing the exhilaration and freedom that comes with sailing. Piers Park Sailing Center (PPSC) is a not-for-profit community sailing center providing free, fully inclusive educational programs for youth who under-served and fully accessible sailing facilities for people living with disabilities. The PPSC strives to empower sailors living with disabilities to realize their recreational goals using adapted teaching methods and a full array of adapted equipment. Piers Park Sailing Center remains one of the only public-access waterfronts in Boston. It is expected that this project will impact 20 individuals living with paralysis and their families.

Pikes Peak Therapeutic Riding Center (PPTRC)
Elbert, Colorado 80106
$3,000 – Therapeutic Horseback Riding – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the Hippotherapy Program. PPTRC and one other therapeutic riding center serve the Pikes Peak Region including Colorado Springs, CO and surrounding areas. PPTRC is unique in being the area's largest and oldest therapeutic riding center, the only center serving adults addressing physical disabilities, and the only center in the region holding Premier Accredited Center status with the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH). PATH is an internationally recognized certification and accreditation organization for the equine-assisted activities and therapy (EAAT) industry. This accreditation, the highest available and maintained by PPTRC since 2001, ensures only the highest level of safety and efficiency are provided to program participants and is preferred by several local agency partners. All PPTRC therapeutic riding instructors are also PATH certified and take part in required on-going training. Without PPTRC's services, area residents would be forced to travel 3.5 hours roundtrip to reach the next closest therapeutic riding center providing the same level and quality of services that PPTRC's Premier Accredited Center status ensures. In addition, no local Hippotherapy option would be available to adults addressing physical disabilities. Grant funds will support costs for two PATH certified PPTRC therapeutic riding instructors. It is expected that 58 individuals living with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project.

Preston's Playground
Newark, Delaware 19711
$3,500 – Accessible Playgrounds/Ball Fields
This Quality of Life grant will support Preston's Playground, a safe, shaded space with a total of 8,400 square feet of rubberized surface and three enter/exit ramps to allow easy access to and from the play area. It will include slides, rock walls, tunnels and steering wheels and telescopes for imaginative play. Equipment is being selected to be inclusive and accessible, including a Rock 'N Wave boat that is wheelchair accessible and ADA-accessible swings, belted swings and standard swings, as well as a fully accessible ADA-compliant restroom at the playground that will include family-style bathrooms that will be open all year. This space will be a destination for families living in Delaware, parts of Maryland, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Grant funds will support the purchase and installation of the Rock ‘N Wave boat. It is expected that 1,000 individuals living with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project.

Raeford United Methodist Church
Raeford, North Carolina 28376
$3,920 – Facility Accessibility Modifications
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Project Access, and initiative to expand accessibility for individuals living with paralysis and other mobility challenges that require them to use wheelchairs and other mobility devices. In addition to church activities, the building is used by three scout troops, AA, NA, a preschool, food pantry, and on occasion job fairs, VFW recognitions, weight watchers, retired teachers association, and autism parent group. The church does not charge any group for use of its facility. Currently four individuals who use the building need motorized wheelchair access. The overall initiative includes a three-increment plan: renovate exterior and interior second floor access points; renovate and construct handicapped accessible restrooms; and install an elevator which accesses the three floors of the building's rear. Each step creates a discrete accessible part of the building. Grant funds will support consultant costs of the architect to draw plans for the facility accessibility modifications. It is expected that at least 10 individuals living with paralysis and their family members will be impacted by this project.

Ramp Access Made Possible by Students (RAMPS)
Richmond, Virginia 23114
$10,000 – Home Accessibility Modifications – Bridging Barriers
This Quality of Life grant will support a nonprofit community service organization based in Richmond and dedicated to aiding those in the community who cannot help themselves. RAMPS develops compassionate young adults through an innovative program that works with high school students. These volunteers donate their time to build modular wheelchair ramps for disabled and elderly people in the community who use a wheelchair or walker for mobility, but cannot afford a ramp to get them safely in and out of their homes. The target population for RAMPS is low-income, and either elderly or disabled (of any age). Since being founded in 2005 by three Richmond-area high school students, over 900 student volunteers from 23 different high schools and colleges have donated over 8,500 hours to improve the lives of these individuals by providing access to the outside world via 328 wheelchair ramps. As a direct result of this service to the community, these students have enabled individuals that use wheelchairs to return to the homes that they could not safely access without a ramp. In six cases, caregivers no longer need to call the local rescue squad to move individuals in and out of their homes. This benefits the community at large as the rescue units are not “off-line” helping these disabled individuals. The organization continues to provide a much-needed service to residents in the Greater Richmond Area. RAMPS is the "go-to" organization for the Virginia Commonwealth University HealthSystem's Spinal Cord Injury and Neuroscience units. Depending upon the length and complexity of the ramp, the cost of a modular ramp averages $3,000. Each student team raises a portion of the funds for the ramp they plan to install. In addition, RAMPS has secured quantity discounts from the ramp manufacturer. The balance of the wheelchair ramp cost is paid for by RAMPS. Grant funds will support AMRAMP Material (hardened modular steel pieces). This project will impact goal at least 40 individuals in this school year, including 15 individuals with paralysis.

Reach Your Potential USA, Inc.
New Brunswick, New Jersey 08901
$2,400 – Employment Program – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the Disability Employment Empowerment Program. In an effort to eliminate the widespread unemployment and workplace bias that exists among the disability community, Reach Your Potential USA has developed a concept to create employment opportunities for individuals of all abilities. Rather than taking the approach of most organizations, this project will not approach businesses that already have a strong record of hiring individuals with disabilities. Instead, the project will target and educate business owners and HR professionals who lack experience in hiring individuals with disabilities. The will be provided with training to eliminate their pre-conceived notions about disabilities and help them to develop strategies for hiring and accommodating individuals with all types of disabilities, including paralysis. This approach will have two main components: a one-day introductory conference followed by on-site customized training. The conference will feature workshops on various topics related to disabilities, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and strategies for accommodating individuals with disabilities. It will also feature a job fair for individuals with disabilities. The conference will be held on an annual basis and the job fair will grow as more businesses complete the training program. The second component of the project will consist of customized workplace inclusion training in which volunteers will provide onsite training to staff at businesses that would like to become more inclusive. This onsite training will include background information about common disabilities, disability simulations, and an evaluation of workplace barriers with cost-effective suggestions for barrier removal. Grant funds will support consultants and supplies. It is expected that this grant will impact 10 individuals living with paralysis and their families.

Rehabilitation Hospital Of The Pacific Foundation
Honolulu, Hawaii 96817
$18,000 – Physical/Occupational Therapy – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the purchase of RT300 FES Cycle system, an upper and lower extremity Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) cycle ergometer, which is proven to be a safe and effective tool for management and prevention of secondary health conditions for individuals with paralysis caused by spinal cord injury. These conditions include a decrease in muscle mass, muscle atrophy, increase in whole body fat, decreased muscle endurance, decreased lower extremity bone density, spasticity, limited joint range of motion and compromised circulation. Physical and metabolic changes can lead to further complications such as skin breakdown (decubitus ulcers), thromboembolic disease, diabetes, and recurrent urinary tract infections, as well as increased risk of fractures and early cardiovascular disease. These complications often result in frequent and lengthy hospitalizations, expensive medical cost and need for greater care for individuals with spinal cord injury. As the only acute-care rehabilitation hospital in Hawaii serving the Pacific, REHAB treats patients experiencing all levels of paralysis resulting from trauma, disease, or illness in an inpatient setting, with three complimentary outpatient clinics throughout the community. Based on the level and nature of injury, experience indicates patients benefit from a continued program of upper lower extremity movement utilizing a rehabilitation system in the acute rehabilitation setting. Since the RT300 FES Cycle system utilizes functional electrical stimulation with exercise, therapy sessions would be more effective and intense than just exercise or electrical stimulation used alone. With electrical stimulation, patients would achieve strong, coordinated muscle contractions in the shoulders and arms as well as in legs and gluteal muscles. It is expected that 3,867 individuals living with paralysis will be impacted by this project.

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Troy, New York 12180
$3,596 – Arts Program – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Expanding a Self-Supporting Network for Assistive Technology for the Arts to School Band Activities. Artists with quadriplegic paralysis have a long tradition in painting. Music and other time-based art forms pose different challenges to people with impaired mobility and are therefore less widely spread. The goal of this project is to enable and promote the experience of companionship and artistic expression in music group performances for people across a wide range of abilities. Fortunately, new head-controlled interfaces provide excellent opportunities for artists with quadriplegic paralysis to engage in music making and other forms of time-based arts. In conjunction with video-conferencing systems these, systems can be used to interconnect participants from home, providing a new form of mobility. Although, the basic technology exists, the knowledge of how to access and best utilize it is not widely spread, and open social networks that help to connect interested participants still have to be formed as well. Most current systems, such as iChat and Skype have been designed for the back-and-forth nature of speech. To avoid audible feedbacks, their echo-cancellation systems temporarily mute the channel for the non-speaking partner. Unfortunately, for the case of two or more people making music together, this means that someone will be cut off. The group of applicants has substantial experience in telecommunication systems that are specially designed for music activities, including systems for the consumer market. The proposed project will bring together expert teams from the Upstate New York Area to discuss the optimal integration of various technologies to improve their accessibility to musicians with paralysis. Grant funds will support Award funds must support Adaptive Music Support personnel; the purchase of 4 Jamboxxes and 16 mouthpieces; posters and flyers for the conference; digital prints of works by of artists living with paralysis, and small supplies. It is expected that this project will impact 50 individuals living with paralysis and their families.

REquipment Durable Medical Equipment & Assistive Technology Reuse Program, Inc.
Methuen, Massachusetts 01844
$9,043 – Durable Medical Equipment – Bridging Barriers
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Durable Medical Equipment Donation Drives. The REquipment Durable Medical Equipment & Assistive Technology Reuse Program, Inc. (REquipment, Inc.) provides information about refurbished durable medical equipment in Massachusetts, promote reuse and reuse programs, collaborate with other organizations and government agencies concerned with the provision of durable medical equipment and assistive technology. REquipment, Inc.is the only entity coordinating DME reuse on a statewide basis. It is the only program that has an online inventory with equipment descriptions, photos and ability to donate or request online. It works with its 4 Reuse Partners, two regionally based reuse programs with equipment for children with disabilities run by parents, 20 loaner programs through Councils on Aging and local city/town Recycling Committees to find and get gently used refurbished DME to people with disabilities and elders. The greatest need for donations however is in the western part of the state in the rural counties of Hampshire, Hampden, Franklin and Berkshire counties. This project will host Equipment Donation Drives between in the following areas: the Southeast region, Boston/Cambridge area, Springfield area and in Berkshire County. In addition to reaching out to organizations serving racially and ethnically diverse groups within these communities this project will also reach out to the city/town recycling programs within these targeted areas to ascertain their interest and level of involvement in the equipment donation drives. Grant funds will support 3 Equipment Donation Drives including translation of materials for into Portuguese and Khmer, rental of storage unit for 3 months post drives, rental of lift equipped vehicle to transport donations, purchase of pop-up tent, folding table, 2 chairs, 6 parking cones and signage materials, and promotional materials. It is expected that this project will impact 175 individuals living with paralysis and their families.

Ride On St. Louis
Kimmswick, Missouri 63053
$3,800 – Therapeutic Horseback Riding – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the Equine Training Program, an initiative to train two new horses for therapeutic riding. Working with individuals that often have profound disabilities may be challenging for the average horse. As a prey animal, horses must be encouraged to ignore instincts to bolt from noises, movements, smells or other animals, taught to stand still for periods of time, taught to respect different handlers on a daily basis, taught to be at peace with groups of people along their sides and face and they must be taught to tolerate and ignore spastic or involuntary muscle reactions of riders, as well as tolerate riders with uneven weight distribution. In addition to the mental challenges, carrying weight, especially uneven distribution or the weight of those with poor tone, may cause discomfort and chronic injury to the average horse. The Ride On St. Louis therapy horses undergo regular and perpetual exercise designed to develop core and back strength as well as overall fitness and endurance. These therapy horses are athletes that require specific training and health management to support their activities. Maintaining physical health supports the overall condition of the horse and allows a horse to perform in the best way so that balanced movements may translate into benefits for riders. Grant funds will support personnel for equine training and equine caretaking. It is expected that 66 individuals living with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project.

Roanoke River Rails to Trails Inc. as Kids = Play
Lawrenceville, Virginia 23868
$15,000 – Accessible Playgrounds/Ball Fields
This Quality of Life will help to support Kids = Play, an inclusive accessible playground in rural South Hill, Virginia. Kids = Play was founded by three high school girls with a passion to make a change. They decided that they wanted to raise awareness about the importance of all-inclusion in their community by raising funds to install a handicapped-accessible playground in their town. So far this organization has celebrated many successes, with tremendous community support and engagement. Grant funds will support the purchase and installation of the glider swing, which enables an individual that uses a wheelchair and someone that does not to swing together. It is expected that 30,000 individuals living with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project.

Rocky Mountain MS Center
Westminster, Colorado
$7,000 – Physical/Occupational Therapy – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the Hydrotherapy Program, which helps adults and seniors living with MS become stronger and more flexible in body and mind. The program offers individuals of all ability levels a variety of exercise opportunities, including adapted swimming, deep and shallow water aerobic exercise, and activities that improve balance and flexibility. Hydrotherapy classes are offered in both individual and small group settings, with six classes available throughout Denver each week. Classes include a variety of techniques and approaches to meet different needs and interests. For many people with MS, hydrotherapy is the only viable form of exercise. The water's resistance allows for more controlled movements, enabling participants to experience a level of independence denied to them in other environments. Water exercise offers individuals who can no longer stand or walk the opportunity to exercise in an upright position. The water creates buoyancy, which enables greater freedom of movement and support for participants. Hydrotherapy is also a great form of exercise for clients who experience heat sensitivity, which is a common symptom of MS. While most aerobic forms of exercise increase core temperatures and can result in heightened symptoms and potentially increased disability, water exercise allows participants to maintain a comfortable body temperature. Clients are able to exercise more vigorously and for longer periods of time. Caregivers also benefit from a client's improved health and fitness as a result of hydrotherapy. For example, improved fitness will typically increase a client's ability to participate in personal care and activities of daily living. Grant funds will support pool fees and the physical therapist that provides hydrotherapy sessions. It is expected that 100 individuals living with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project.

Rocky Mt. Independence for the Physically Challenged
Centennial, Colorado
$3,825 – Adaptive Sports – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Awesome Adventures, a camp for youth that use wheelchairs for mobility. Youth ages 9-12 years old and their parents spend an introductory weekend camp in September at Breckenridge Outdoor Education Center (BOEC), an adaptive sports center in Breckenridge. The campers learn new skills in a safe and nurturing environment. They will participate in a high ropes course, a climbing wall, and kayaking and canoeing. They will be with other kids who have similar challenges and are close in age promoting friendships and a sense of community. The children will be given opportunities and encouraged to be more independent. Parents will be reminded to encourage their child to do as much of their own self-care as they can. The experiences at this camp will help prepare them so that they can attend RMIPC's regular outdoor adventure and independence camps in the future. Participating in an outdoor adventure camp is a wonderful way to become more active as well as more independent by trying something new. As they are introduced to accessible activities that they never dreamt they could do, and try to do these new activities their self-esteem and confidence grows. It may be the first time that they get to spend time with other children that have similar disabilities. The sense of community that develops is amazing resulting in the kids not having to worry about being different and so they can relax and really have fun. The new friendships that they make are very special since these children typically do not know other children with similar challenges in their own neighborhoods and communities. These new friendships, along with their higher self-esteem, can help them have more confidence in making new friends when they get home. This project will fund the attendance of 6 campers that are wheelchair users, ages 9 -12, and their parents at the introductory camp.

Rotary Club of Hendersonville / Mary's Magical Place Playground
Hendersonville, Tennessee
$12,500 – Accessible Playground/Ball Field
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Mary's Magical Place Playground, an all-inclusive playground where children of ALL abilities can play together. It will foster barrier-free social interactions, raise awareness, reduce prejudices, and increase opportunities for physical activity for individuals with special needs. Grant funds will support the purchase and installation of the Ability Whirl, a specially designed playground piece that accommodates individuals that use wheelchairs along with individuals that do not. It is expected that this project will impact 5,000 individuals living with paralysis and their families.

S - T

Southampton Fresh Air Home
Southampton, New York
$5,500 – Camp – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Year Round Expansion of Camp Programming. The program expansion will ensure that the independence, freedom, and friendship can be enjoyed for the entire year. Off-season programs will also be extended to young adult alumni of the summer camp, who face a paucity of services after the age of 18. Providing support to campers as they enter the world beyond camp will prepare bright, ambitious, and compassionate children to become strong, successful and compassionate adults. Particular attention will be given to campers in high school and young adult alumni between the ages of 18 and 25. And, a particular focus will be put on extending opportunities for outings and day trips to low income youth who would not otherwise be able to attend events such as concerts and baseball games. All programs in the “expansion” are currently provided free of charge regardless of income through the generous support of donors. Grant funds will support direct-care counselors for off-season programs and travel stipends for campers for respite weekends and day trips. It is expected that 570 individuals living with paralysis will be impacted by this program.

Southwest Wheelchair Athletic Association
Hurst, Texas
$8,805 – Adaptive Sports – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the Texas Tract/Field Program, which allows for the high school athletes living with disabilities to be on their track and field high school team, earn a letter jacket and compete in State Championship Meet to represent their school. Athletes that start at a younger age can join their middle school teams. Being active in a sport increases self-esteem and self-confidence and teaches the individual with a disability how to lead a healthy lifestyle. It increases their strength and forces them to transfer in and out of their everyday chair to the sports chair. Also, these students are a role model for the other students in their schools now to show the able-bodied students what they can accomplish. Texas is just one of 22 states that allow individuals with disabilities to participate on their school team with their able-bodied peers. In the future, this program may expand to swimming and tennis within the school system as well. Grant funds will support the purchase of the following track/field equipment: 3 racing wheelchairs, 7 field wheelchairs and 4 pairs of racing gloves. It is expected that this project will impact 50 individuals living with paralysis and their families.

Stay-Focused
New York, New York
$8,875 – Adaptive Sports – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the First-Time Diver Program, which will enable six teens that live with paralysis to become certified as PADI SCUBA divers, which means they can dive anywhere in the world, accompanied by a diving instructor or dive master. It represents a significant accomplishment in trying a new sport (which most of participants never imagined would be possible – nor did their parents), overcoming some initial anxiety, which is normal for all SCUBA divers, and knowing they had not been treated differently. It offers them bragging rights among their peers, which is a good thing for any teen in building confidence and independence. Grant funds will support PADI eLearning enrollments, participant travel and hotel accommodations, dive boat rental, and supplies. It is expected that 24 individuals living with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project.

Stonington Free Library
Stonington, Connecticut
$7,500 – Facility Accessibility Modifications – Bridging Barriers
This Quality of Life grant will help to support accessibility modifications at the historic Stonington Free Library, built in 1888. Stonington Free Library serves as the principal public library for the Town of Stonington, Connecticut which has a population of approximately 18,000 people. Each year, the Library offers a wide variety of programs and services for all age groups including a very popular summer reading program for children that attracts over 700 participants each year. A variety of materials are provided for loan and use including print books and magazines, e-books, e-readers, fax, printing and copy services, computers, wifi, audiobooks, and DVDs. Technical assistance is also provided for patrons who need help with their electronic devices. The Library has approximately 78,000 visits by community members each year. In the late 1990s, an ADA-accessible lift was installed in a stairwell to provide access to the lower level. The lift is rudimentary and has been quite troublesome as the design is inadequate to support routine use and it regularly malfunctions. In recent years the Library has found it difficult to even have the lift repaired as the company that manufactured it went out of business and parts and service professionals can no longer be sourced. It was found that the existing lift no longer complies with current ADA requirements and that a compliant lift would not fit in the existing location. A major remodel of the stairwell doorways is required to create independent access. It was therefore decided to relocate the lift to a more central place in the Library to allow easier access directly from the main floor of the Library. Grant funds will support consultant fees of the architect to create plans for the accessibility modifications. It is expected that this project will impact 1,000 individuals living with paralysis and their families.

Sunnyview Hospital and Rehabilitation Center Foundation, Inc.
Schenectady, New York
$3,647 – Physical/Occupational Therapy – Caring & Community
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Respiratory Muscle Strength Training (RMST) to Increase Quality of Life. Research has found RMST to benefit a variety of patient populations such as individuals with spinal cord injury, Parkinson's Disease, multiple sclerosis, and ALS, among others, delivering functional improvements in areas such as swallowing, coughing/airway protection, ventilator weaning, volume for speech. Each of these improvements promote the ability of individuals to live independently and complete activities of daily living, ensuring inclusion and integration in their community. Additionally, removal from ventilator and ability to safely ingest food is also critical is returning individuals to independence they seek. RMST provides an opportunity to meaningfully address the complex day-to-day health and personal issues for individuals living with disabilities, their families and caregivers so that each individual may participate in activities that enrich their lives. Grant funds will support the purchase of the EMST 150 Trainer-Expiratory Muscle Strength Trainer, the Threshold IMT Inspiratory Muscle trainer, respiratory pressure meter, replacement mouthpieces, viral/bacterial filters and flanged mouthpieces. It is expected that this project will impact 170 individuals living with paralysis and their families.

Sunset Hill Educational Institute
South Sutton, New Hampshire
$7,370
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Wheelchair Health in Motion (WHIM), a free community fitness program geared for individuals living with paralysis. WHIM is a peer-driven program that was developed in 2011 by three women who had experienced spinal cord injuries in different accidents and were all diagnosed with quadriplegia. WHIM provides the tools for increasing quality of life and promoting wellness in individuals living with a physical disability or low mobility through innovative upper-body aerobic exercise and positive peer support within their own community. Quality of life has a different definition for each person, however, reoccurring themes are independence, power to cope, enjoying life activities, good health, good social support and feelings of accomplishment. This program focuses on helping each individual reach their optimal goals regarding their quality of life. WHIM also strives to be a toolbox full of ongoing support resources that individuals with disability can utilize for increasing their quality of life, for example: vocational rehabilitation contacts, informational webcast alerts, advocacy alerts, and recreational opportunities and contacts. Grant funds will help to support costs for the trainer, costs for the peer leader to outreach and help manage the needs of peer leaders, travel costs to develop three new WHIM sites. It is expected that 200 individuals living with paralysis will be impacted by this project.

Texas Lions Camp, Inc.
Kerrville, Texas
$6,000 – Camp – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support camps for children with special medical conditions. The goal of Texas Lions Camp (TLC) is to provide an atmosphere wherein campers will learn the "Can Do" philosophy and be allowed to achieve maximum personal growth and self-esteem. The TLC medical and program teams work together to provide opportunities for growth in confidence and self-help skills. TLC campers learn about dealing with their respective conditions and sharing with others who have the same condition. Combined with medical education so that children learn to care for themselves, camps invite children to engage in activities normally thought out of their reach. Campers learn about dealing with their respective conditions in a fun and safe environment, share with others who have the same condition and learn team-building activities with peers that promotes group engagement. Best of all, children attend camp at no cost to them or their families and when needed, transportation is also provided at no additional cost, so expense or financial hardships are never a determining factor in who is able to participate. Grant funds will support adaptive supplies for archery, aquatics and equestrian activities. It is expected that 150 individuals living with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this program.

The ALS Association Golden West Chapter
Agoura Hills, California
$12,500 – Assistive Technology Initiative – Bridging Barriers
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the equipment loan library, which provides loans at no cost of assistive technology and durable medical equipment for individuals living with ALS. Grant funds will support the purchase of travel wheelchairs, voice amplifiers, headband microphones, adaptive switches, transfer benches, wheelchair cushions, mounts and seat lifts, and will help support the consultant fees for the therapists to make assessments. It is expected that this project will impact 200 individuals living with ALS and their families.

The Center for Individuals with Physical Challenges
Tulsa, Oklahoma
$13,000 – Adaptive Sports – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the Wheelchair Softball Program. A designated U.S. Paralympic Sport Club and the only facility of its kind in the region, The Center recognizes the importance of adaptive sports in supporting an active and healthy lifestyle for those living with physical disabilities. Further, sports provide a shared cultural experience, offering rich opportunities to connect people and communities. Although softball is a popular sport in our regional culture, there is currently no organized, competitive Wheelchair Softball Program in Oklahoma. To ensure that those living with paralysis, as well as other physical disabilities, have access to this active team sport, The Center plans to add a Wheelchair Softball Program to its adaptive sports offerings. The Center currently has 4 existing sport chairs that can be utilized for wheelchair softball. Grant funds will support the purchase 5 sport wheelchairs to complete the number required for a team. The Center's Wheelchair Softball Program will provide a fun and engaging team sport for people to improve their fitness while enjoying opportunities to increase their socialization, improve their athletic skills, and enhance their self-confidence. It is expected that 30 individuals living with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project.

The College at Brockport, State University of New York
Brockport, New York
$11,000 – Adaptive Sports – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life will help to fund an initiative to expand athletic opportunities for students and community members that use wheelchairs. Access to sport wheelchairs will serve the Brockport community in at least three significant ways: enhancing the academic experience of students (e.g. those in the adapted physical education program and the recreation and leisure studies program), providing inclusive opportunities for students with and without disabilities to play and recreate together, and generating opportunities for the college to serve the community of people with disabilities throughout the region. Another major goal is to teach future teachers how to teach children with disabilities in physical education. Grant funds will support the purchase of 5 sports wheelchairs. It is expected that this project will impact 1,000 individuals living with paralysis and their families.

The Gateway Family YMCA
Elizabeth, New Jersey
$10,000 – Arts Program – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the Specialized Arts Inclusive Learning (SAIL) Program - Digital Arts Training & Inclusion. By utilizing the consultation and training services of Matheny Medical and Educational Center to develop an “Arts Access-Inspired” component to SAIL, the YMCA intends to both enhance the inclusiveness of the program as well as each SAIL artist's ability to create unique pieces that solely display their vision. Similar to Matheny's Arts Access program, the tailored version offered by the YMCA will incorporate digital equipment which allows participants to choose the colors, shapes, textures, etc. they wish to display in their piece, that are selected through voice recognition and/or technology that can identify the selection based on the user's eye movements. Then, using the artists selections, staff facilitators who are trained to remain neutral throughout the creative process, support the artist as they explore their artistic talents and create unique works of art both digitally and/or through other traditional formats such as painting and collage. Grant funds will help to support ongoing consultation and training services provided by Matheny Medical and Educational Center. It is expected that 500 individuals living with paralysis will be impacted by this project.

The Michigan State University Community Music School (CMS)
East Lansing, Michigan
$10,000 – Arts Program – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the iCan with iPads Outreach Program – Free Music Therapy Services for Persons with Paralysis. The project will expand upon the iCan with iPads program through an outreach program that will provide music therapy to students using assistive technology, at no cost to the caregiver or student. CMS has identified organizations and group homes with which it already partners to visit for this program. One certified music therapist will visit the partner organizations to work with their clients for approximately 2 hours each week, over a 42-week period. Therapy sessions will be done in a group or individual setting, determined between MTCS and the partner location to determine the best approach for the development of the participants. Sessions will include the assistive technology, using iPads with appropriate applications and accessories to allow individuals with limited mobility or paralysis to make music. This equipment will enhance the effectiveness of interventions designed to improve overall physical rehabilitation and facilitate movement, increase participants ‘ motivation to become engaged in their treatment, and provide an outlet for the expression of feelings. The sessions will target individuals with paralysis specifically, but the technology will be available to all persons with special needs if it is not otherwise in use. The primary goal of this project is to reach more people, specifically those with limited mobility or paralysis, through music therapy and make these interventions, which have proven to be successful, more accessible to those in need. Grant funds will help to support costs for the music therapist to provide free sessions and related travel costs. It is expected that 125 individuals living with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project.

The Miracle League of North Mankato
Mankato, Minnesota
$15,314 – Accessible Playground/Ball Field
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the Fallenstein Playground, which will be located next to the Miracle League at Fallenstein Field in Caswell Park. It is a natural location for an inclusive play space as many children, youth and adults who participate in Miracle League events can easily access the playground. The Miracle League of North Mankato has experienced tremendous growth in its programming the past three years bringing more children and families to Fallenstein Field at Caswell Park. The City of North Mankato and their city council approved use of the one-third acre parcel where the playground will be built. When people can come together in community spaces that are accessible, welcoming and cater to a wide variety of needs, situations of bullying can be reduced. When opportunities are provided to celebrate differences and to respect each person are fostered, the light of acceptance can be illuminated in places where once the darkness of intolerance existed. Grant funds will help to support consultant costs for the playground design and the purchase and installation of the SwayFun Glider, a fully wheelchair-accessible glider that enables individuals that use wheelchairs and those that do not so that they can play together. It is expected that 1,000 individuals living with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project.

The New School
New York, New York
$12,500 – Education Program – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the Open Style Lab (OSL) at Parsons. Paralysis and other disabilities that limit mobility often directly impact a person's ability to dress independently and restrict the range of clothing that they can wear. Limited clothing choice can decrease social participation, resulting in lower employment rates and increased rates of depression. OSL at Parsons seeks to raise awareness about the need for accessible apparel, and equip students to create accessible yet stylish clothing solutions for people with disabilities through project-based educational programs that team designers, engineers, and rehabilitation therapists. OSL partners students with people with disabilities (including spinal cord injuries, severe arthritis, and muscular dystrophy), who share similar levels of functioning, and consequently, clothing challenges. Thus, many clothing solutions developed through Open Style Lab directly benefits people with that live with paralysis. Further, through close interactions with their clients, students also gain an understanding of the pathology of spinal cord injury and disease and other daily life challenges that people faced by individuals living with paralysis, and learn to become their advocates. Grant funds will support the project leader/lead teacher, pattern maker and seamstress and fabrication support, materials, and required indirect costs. It is expected that 5 individuals living with paralysis will be impacted by this project.

Theater for the New City
New York, New York
$7,000 – Facility Accessibility Modifications – Bridging Barriers
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the installation of a Handilift Elevator, which will replace the lift that has been in place for the past 10 years but that is no longer safely operational. Theater for the New City prides itself on accessibility to all of its patrons and staff, but had to turn some patrons away because of the non-functioning lift. In order to fully accomplish the goal of “Bringing the theater into the community and the community into the theater”, a lift to provide accessibility is essential. A large population of frail, elderly New Yorkers, many who are living with paralysis, are served by the Theatre, so it is imperative that safe wheelchair access is provided to the lower level theater. This is critical to the four-theater complex because it provides accessibility to artists, staff, and volunteers and any person with a mobility disability to gain access to the theaters, costume shop, rehearsal spaces and prop storage area, as well as lower level accessible restrooms. It is expected that 300 individuals living with paralysis will be impacted by this project.

Town of Wabeno
Wabeno, Wisconsin
$7,332 – Facility Accessibility Modifications – Bridging Barriers
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the Wabeno Park Improvement Project, which will create freedom of access to the natural resources in the community for all its residents and visitors. Being able to get exercise safely, enjoy a leisurely trip along the boardwalk and trail, sit on the piers, fish for native brook trout or watch the birds and other wildlife while chatting with another resident or visitor to our parks says "I belong and I am a part of this community.” Grant funds will support the installation of accessible family showers and toilets in the bathhouse used by campers and community members, and which accommodates a host of large community events. It is expected that 1,000 individuals living with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project.

Trach Mommas of Louisiana
Baton Rouge, Louisiana
$24,990
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the Trach Mommas of Louisiana's Power Inverter Project: The POWER to Save Lives! Trach Mommas of Louisiana's mission is focused on individuals with tracheostomies and families/caregivers of individuals with tracheostomies. These people require multiple pieces of life-saving equipment, including but not limited to ventilators, oxygen concentrators, suction machines, pulse oximeters, apnea monitors, and feeding pumps. Many of these machines only have a limited battery capacity, which places lives on a timeline when car travel is necessary. The individuals frequently have doctor's appointments, therapies, etc. that require them to be in the car for several hours at a time. Louisiana is blanketed with health professional shortage areas, so travel by car for care is essential for many families to be able to access specialty care, often to facilities out of state. Traffic and natural disasters can worsen an already drastic situation when families need to evacuate or reach healthcare quickly. Power inverter technology allows battery-operated medical equipment to be powered by a car battery and greatly extends the life of the batteries, which can literally save the life of a person with a trach, keep them safe in emergency and other unanticipated situations, and can mean access to other life-saving healthcare. Since vehicle batteries are unable to power multiple pieces of equipment, power inverters create a new power source, meaning that equipment can be used that is typically not used in vehicles due to lack of a power source. Grant funds will support 40 Power Inverter Equipment Packages (Inverter, Terminal Connector, Cable, Circuit Breaker, Battery Cable Terminal, Sealed AGM Battery, Battery Box, and labor allowance), consultant costs for emergency preparedness training, and mileage for equipment distribution and training, and shipping and handling costs. It is expected that 240 individuals living with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project.

Tualatin Hills Park Foundation
Beaverton, Oregon
$5,000 – Accessible Playground/Ball Field
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the expansion of recreational activities at the community park and recreational area that are accessible to individuals with limited mobility that use wheelchairs and other devices. Grant funds will help to support the installation of the Hillside Slide and Accessible Swing at the all-abilities inclusive playground, which will be located in the socially and economically diverse community of Aloha, and will be a major attraction in a park that combines multiple features promoting inclusion, social engagement and access to recreation for people with disabilities. Neighborhood families speak some two dozen native languages, and nearly 60% of students in the neighborhood are eligible for free or reduced lunch. Because of its inclusive features, the completed park is expected to draw visitors from throughout the Portland Metropolitan region. It is expected that 80,000 individuals living with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project.

Tucker's House
Spring Hill, Tennessee
$15,150 – Home Accessibility Modifications – Bridging Barriers
This Quality of Life grant will help to support a program that provides home renovations and retrofitting services and resources to make homes safer and more accessible for children with disabilities and their caregivers. The families served by Tucker's House have low to moderate incomes and they cannot afford home modifications nor do they know what modifications are needed or who can provide them, and Tucker's House is the only agency in middle Tennessee that provides these services. Home modifications, such as ramps, roll-in showers, and chair or ceiling lifts can eliminate or reduce the number of lifts and, therefore, significantly reduce the risk of injuries to children and caregivers. Grant funds will support supplies for home accessibility modifications. It is expected that 108 individuals living with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project.

U - Z

United Brachial Plexus Network
Reading, Massachusetts
$10,750 – Camp – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the United Brachial Plexus Network (UBPN) Camp 2017. Brachial Plexus Injury (or palsy) is formerly known as Erb's Palsy. The change in name was to better describe the effects of the injury; i.e., that it is an injury to the brachial plexus, the bundle of nerves in the neck which control the shoulder arm and hand. UBPN Camp educates, supports and empowers the community. This Camp increases the ability of the individuals with brachial plexus injury to prove to not only themselves, but also to their caregivers that they are capable of making their own accommodations to accomplish the tasks of everyday living. The act of being together, learning from each other, relying on each other shows the people with injuries and their caregivers that capabilities exist which were otherwise unknown. Caregivers of individuals with brachial plexus injuries have a tendency to be overly protective. If the caregiver is a parent, this usually due to the nature of the injury being at the time of birth, which leads to guilt. Camp is a place where the caregivers see that their loved ones are capable and that they can assist in a different way. Grant funds will support personnel costs for planning and coordinating the camps, consultant fees for speakers, supplies for arts and crafts, camp program books, and tuition for campers living with brachial plexus injury (who attend camp free of charge). It is expected that this project will impact 250 individuals living with paralysis and their families.

Utah State University Utah Conservation Corps
Logan, Utah
$24,000 – Employment Program – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the Utah Conservation Corps Inclusive Crew. The Utah Conservation Corps (UCC) was founded in 2001 by a group of concerned citizens that saw the need for a statewide conservation corps that created leadership development opportunities for youth and young adults while addressing critical natural resource conservation needs. The UCC is an AmeriCorps program based out of Utah State University that completes a number of conservation and environmental education projects throughout the state. The UCC expanded its opportunities for youth and young adults with disabilities in 2007 with the inclusive crew. Two years prior to this, Andy Zimmer, a UCC crew leader, was in a bike accident that resulted in quadriplegia. After rehabilitation, Andy wanted to return to the UCC and complete his AmeriCorps term of service. At that time, there were no opportunities for him to serve in a field-based conservation corps anywhere in the country. Through his rehabilitation process, he worked with UCC staff to design a crew that would give people of all abilities a chance to serve an AmeriCorps position on a conservation corps field crew. This crew experience for corps members with disabilities reflects the traditional corps member experience: living in a tent, spending every day outside, working on conservation projects, and being part of a close-knit team. Due to the success of the inclusive crew, the UCC has been a strong advocate for the inclusion of people with disabilities in AmeriCorps national service programs. Inclusive crew projects are intentionally selected and designed to include crew members of all physical abilities. Crew members with disabilities are actively involved in all phases of the project, adding a valuable perspective and knowledge that only comes with living with a disability. Grant funds will support extension of the current inclusive crew ADA/ABA survey work in the Dixie National Forest for another eight weeks in 2018. Specifically, funds will support personnel costs for 4 AmeriCorp members and project personnel, adaptive hand tools and measuring devices, uniforms and personal protective equipment, a laptop computer and solar charging device for field data collection, rental of a wheelchair accessible van, and Utah State University required indirect costs. It is expected that 3 individuals living with paralysis will be impacted by this project, as well as many more that will ultimately be impacted by improved accessibility at parks and recreational areas.

Variety - the Children's Charity
Wexford, Pennsylvania
$6,000 – Durable Medical Equipment – Bridging Barriers
This Quality of Life grant will support Variety's My Stroller Program, which provides adaptive strollers to eligible children ages 4 through 21 who have a documented developmental, physical, and/or sensory disability, and whose household income is at or below 400% of the federal poverty level. Without a comfortable, safe, and easier mode of mobility, many families are missing out on the opportunity to fully participate in their communities, and parents and caregivers are at increased risk of injury. An adaptive stroller has an immediate impact for these families. It is not your typical infant stroller, but an individually customized piece of mobility equipment. It is a basic and fundamental need for getting around, and it allows kids with disabilities to be mobile in ways they could not before. As other types of mobility equipment, like wheelchairs, are often more “necessary”, children miss out on the accessibility and the social benefits of an adaptive stroller. For many families, the cost of an adaptive stroller is either out of reach or it significantly stretches a family's budget. Variety then hosts a community presentation alongside program partners for the children and their families as a way to celebrate the special moment together. These public presentations are helping reshape how people in the community view children with disabilities. Variety's “My Stroller” Program is a positive way for people in the community to interact with kids with disabilities and gain a better understanding of the challenges they face each day. Grant funds will support the purchase of 5 adaptive strollers for children with disabilities. It is expected that this project will impact 30 individuals living with paralysis and their families.

Wasatch Adaptive Sports (WAS)
Snowbird, Utah
$6,742 – Adaptive Sports – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the purchase of a TESSIER Snow'Kart, a sit-ski device which enables an individual with limited upper body strength to ski independently in this by steering and braking for themselves with the use of levers (for those with mobility in both arms) or with a bar (for those with hemiparesis). This state-of-the-art equipment has an articulated seat, is more stable and easier to use that other equipment, and allows increased versatility due to adult and child-specific levers. It is also the only device in production that can be driven with one hand using the EasyDrive kit. The addition of this device to WAS's fleet would result in the ability to better serve current participants and allow for programmatic growth to engage even more people with limited upper body strength and mobility, thus extending organizational reach and impact. It is expected that this project will impact 350 individuals living with paralysis and their families.

Webster Central School District
Webster, New York
$8,017 – Adaptive Sports – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the launch of the Adaptive Rock Climbing Club. At present, students with disabilities don't have the opportunity to climb the rock wall due to lack of safety equipment, adaptive harnesses and belay systems. Students with disabilities participate in a parallel activity instead. This fosters a non-inclusive, non-meaningful experience that leaves students with a feeling of discouragement and being left out. Students with disabilities want to be challenged and want to engage in meaningful activities with peers. The Adapted Rock Climbing Club will be an inclusive after-school club for any students with disabilities between fifth and twelfth grade who wish to learn to rock climb in a safe controlled environment with their peers. Students without disabilities will be chosen as buddies for the students with disabilities. Students with and without disabilities will work together over 6 weeks in an inclusive setting to learn to climb, problem solve and work as a team to overcome obstacles. The culminating event will be held at a local Rock Climbing facility. If successful it is hoped that the program will spread across Rochester, New York and beyond, providing an empowering, independent and inclusive experience for people with disabilities. Grant funds will support adaptive rock climbing equipment, initial belay certification for 6 physical education teachers and related transportation expenses, and consultant costs for ongoing maintenance and inspection of climbing equipment at school sites. It is expected that 100 individuals living with paralysis and their families will be impacted by this project.

Wheeling Forward Inc.
Brooklyn, New York
$23,400 – Fitness and Wellness – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the Axis Project, a new and innovative multidisciplinary center specifically designed for people with disabilities. Located in a 7,500 square feet space in New York City, it offers programs and activities designed to empower and motivate people with physical disabilities to pursue a healthy, active lifestyle. The Center is wheelchair accessible and features accessible equipment. The Axis Project offers the following programs and services, specifically designed and made accessible for those with disabilities: a comprehensive fitness program of strength training; core trunk building; and aerobic exercises with trained personal trainers available at all times to provide individualized assistance; a unique yoga program adapted for individuals living with mobility impairments; other exercise programming such as wheelchair Zumba, boxing, standing frame class, martial arts, wheelchair mobility training, handcycling, and more; wheelchair repair services to help with routine maintenance of wheelchairs; advocacy desk for people with questions about community services, benefits and more; an assistive technology lab; support groups and life/career coach services; art therapy and creative writing; transportation, and daily nutritious meals to clients (an important form of assistance for a population heavily comprised of Medicaid beneficiaries). The Axis Project's participants come from the NYC disability community, all of whom are either Medicaid beneficiaries, living in institutions, or otherwise disadvantaged (such as individuals that do not have documents). The Axis Project has an open-door policy for individuals living with spinal cord injury, enabling them to join and benefit from services regardless of insurance or financial means. Grant funds will support the purchase of 3 Krank Cycles, 1 Uppertone Exercise machine, 2 EasyStand Standing Frames, 1 Access Xpress Gym machine, and 1 RehaMove FES bike. It is expected that 500 individuals living with paralysis will be impacted by this project.

Wheels of Progress
New York, New York
$14,000 – Education Program – Actively Achieving
This Quality of Life grant will help to support the Axis Project University, which seeks to increase the employability of people with spinal cord injury or spinal cord-related diseases. In 2014, Wheels of Progress partnered with Wheeling Forward, another nonprofit organization based in New York City, to create The Axis Project (TAP). TAP is the answer to the lack of socialization: it is an innovative multidisciplinary center specifically designed for people with disabilities. The TAP University initiative provides a clear way for individuals living with paralysis to acquire marketable employment skills in a setting tailored to their needs. Grant funds will support the purchase of 10 Jouse 3 Joystick Operated USB Mouse devices. It is expected that 120 individuals living with paralysis will be impacted by this project.

Winston Salem State University – PT and OT Clinics
Winston Salem, North Carolina
$15,262 – Durable Medical Equipment – Bridging Barriers
This Quality of Life grant will help to support Community Care Clinics and Neurologic Program Enhancement. Currently, the physical and occupational therapy programs at WSSU partner with the Community Care Clinic of Forsyth County to provide pro bono physical and occupational therapy services to the patients who attend the clinic. The Community Care Center (CCC) provides access to high-quality medical and dental care for the medically uninsured for residents of Forsyth, Davie, and Stokes counties. A second outreach is the REACHE neurologic clinic, which is provided once per month at Maizie Woodruff Continuing Education Center. This Center provides access to ongoing care to those who are underserved and also refers to the Community Care Center for follow up care for those patients with complex conditions including, but not limited to: spinal cord injury, post-polio, and stroke. A final outreach is MSFit, a program established to address the ongoing needs of individuals of low socioeconomic status affected by multiple sclerosis. Participants in this program are seen once per month by physical and occupational therapists, who modify wellness programs and facilitate integration into fitness classes with modification at the YWCA. This program is delivered at no cost to participants. Grant funds will support purchase a mobile trailer and hitch to transport equipment to mobile sites that host MSFit and the REACHE Clinic; the purchase of a tablet computer, VHI software, and a portable printer for mobile clinics, which enable therapists to provide clear and concise home exercise programs to clients and their families in languages that they can understand, and enhance functional recovery of patients living with paralysis; and the purchase of 2 patterned electrical nerve stimulation units and 2 WalkAide systems. These devices will be used to improve motor recovery in those individuals with paralysis. It is expected that this project will impact 100 individuals living with paralysis and their families.

This project was supported, in part by grant number 90PR3002, from the U.S. Administration for Community Living, Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, D.C. 20201. Grantees undertaking projects under government sponsorship are encouraged to express freely their findings and conclusions. Points of view or opinions do not, therefore, necessarily represent official Administration for Community Living policy.